2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/203267
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Frontline Nurse Immersion in EBP: Practice Changes Emerge from Mixed Methods
Abstract:
(Summer Institute) Problem: Frontline nurses lack knowledge of evidence-based geriatric best practices, and many lack skill in accessing current literature and synthesizing findings. Evidence: Nursing professionals are poorly prepared to provide age-specific care to geriatric patients1 in a time when aging of the American population is a critical U. S. public health issue.2 Many frontline nurses have not had formal education in geriatrics or in evidence-based practice/research, but little has been done to change this. Strategy: Education was provided to frontline nurses in a 2-day workshop in combination with a series of six monthly project development day-long sessions. Multiple teaching methodologies were utilized in delivering content within workshop sessions. Topics covered in didactic sessions included: evidence-based geriatric best practices related to geriatric syndromes; age-related physiologic changes; literature searching; reading and synthesizing research articles; project development; practice change implementation; and presentation tips and templates. Other learning modalities included project development meetings and collaboration with topic-related experts. Practice Change: Frontline nurse-led teams designed and implemented evidence-based practice changes. Evaluation: Program success was determined through participant satisfaction; participants’ demonstration of research skills; project development and implementation; and dissemination of project findings to professional colleagues. Results: Three project teams implemented practice changes and one team recommended further hospital-wide education. Team members have submitted six different abstracts to professional conferences. Recommendations: Mixed teaching methodologies and ample coaching and mentoring contribute to a successful program when teaching frontline nurses to design and implement evidence-based practice changes. Lessons Learned: Plan additional time for individual and team coaching sessions. Coaching unleashes human potential to produce excellence in personal performance.3 Bibliography: 1. Klein, S.M. & Kelley, L.S. (1997). A National Agenda for Geriatric Education: White Papers. US: Springer Publishing. 2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention & the Merck Company Foundation.(2007). The State of Aging and Health in America. Whitehouse Station, NJ:The Merck Company Foundation. Available at: www.cdc.gov/aging/pdf/saha_2007.pdf. 3. Kowalski, K. & Casper, C. (2007). The coaching process: An effective tool for professional development. Nursing Administration Quarterly, 31(2), 171-179. [© Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice, 2011. http://www.acestar.uthscsa.edu]
Keywords:
Practice; Method
Repository Posting Date:
16-Jan-2012
Date of Publication:
3-Jan-2012
Sponsors:
UTHSCSA Summer Institute

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFrontline Nurse Immersion in EBP: Practice Changes Emerge from Mixed Methodsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/203267-
dc.description.abstract(Summer Institute) Problem: Frontline nurses lack knowledge of evidence-based geriatric best practices, and many lack skill in accessing current literature and synthesizing findings. Evidence: Nursing professionals are poorly prepared to provide age-specific care to geriatric patients1 in a time when aging of the American population is a critical U. S. public health issue.2 Many frontline nurses have not had formal education in geriatrics or in evidence-based practice/research, but little has been done to change this. Strategy: Education was provided to frontline nurses in a 2-day workshop in combination with a series of six monthly project development day-long sessions. Multiple teaching methodologies were utilized in delivering content within workshop sessions. Topics covered in didactic sessions included: evidence-based geriatric best practices related to geriatric syndromes; age-related physiologic changes; literature searching; reading and synthesizing research articles; project development; practice change implementation; and presentation tips and templates. Other learning modalities included project development meetings and collaboration with topic-related experts. Practice Change: Frontline nurse-led teams designed and implemented evidence-based practice changes. Evaluation: Program success was determined through participant satisfaction; participants’ demonstration of research skills; project development and implementation; and dissemination of project findings to professional colleagues. Results: Three project teams implemented practice changes and one team recommended further hospital-wide education. Team members have submitted six different abstracts to professional conferences. Recommendations: Mixed teaching methodologies and ample coaching and mentoring contribute to a successful program when teaching frontline nurses to design and implement evidence-based practice changes. Lessons Learned: Plan additional time for individual and team coaching sessions. Coaching unleashes human potential to produce excellence in personal performance.3 Bibliography: 1. Klein, S.M. & Kelley, L.S. (1997). A National Agenda for Geriatric Education: White Papers. US: Springer Publishing. 2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention & the Merck Company Foundation.(2007). The State of Aging and Health in America. Whitehouse Station, NJ:The Merck Company Foundation. Available at: www.cdc.gov/aging/pdf/saha_2007.pdf. 3. Kowalski, K. & Casper, C. (2007). The coaching process: An effective tool for professional development. Nursing Administration Quarterly, 31(2), 171-179. [© Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice, 2011. http://www.acestar.uthscsa.edu]en_GB
dc.subjectPracticeen_GB
dc.subjectMethoden_GB
dc.date.available2012-01-16T11:06:50Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-03en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-16T11:06:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipUTHSCSA Summer Instituteen_GB
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