2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211452
Type:
Research Study
Title:
BASELINE SYMPTOM CLUSTERS AMONG MEN UNDERGOING PROSTATE CANCER TREATMENT
Abstract:
Rationale/Purpose: Most individuals diagnosed with cancer do not report a single symptom; instead they have multiple symptoms associated with the disease and treatment. The interactive and cumulative effect of multiple symptoms adversely affects quality of life. Three or more symptoms which occur concurrently are called a symptom cluster.  The most common cancer diagnosed in men is prostate cancer and yet there is a paucity of information on the prostate cancer symptom experience. Even more limiting are findings on symptom clusters in men with prostate cancer who often experience general symptoms of fatigue, pain, insomnia, depression, and anxiety and specific treatment related symptoms (i.e., urinary, bowel and sexual). The purpose of this paper is to describe baseline symptoms and symptom clusters in men undergoing radiation treatment for prostate cancer. Methods: A sample of 84 men completed questionnaires which measured quality of life and the nine symptoms of interest prior to the start of radiation treatment. Participants had a mean age of 69 (SD=8.2), were predominately white (84%), and scheduled to begin radiation treatment. Some men were also receiving hormone therapy (38%). Gleason scores for the sample ranged from 5 to 10 (M=7.14, SD=1.0), with a mean PSA level at diagnosis of 8.6 ng/mL (SD=7.3 ng/mL).  All scales demonstrated good reliability and validity in prior studies with cancer patients. Latent profile analysis was used to identify subgroups of men similar to each other based on distinct symptom profiles. One-way ANOVAs with Tukey’s pairwise comparisons were conducted to determine if differences existed among the resulting clusters on quality of life and participant characteristics. Results: Four clusters of men were identified with significant differences in symptoms. Group 1 (n=3) which was labeled “overwhelmed’ included younger men who were consistently high on all symptoms. Group 2 (n=48) who reported little to no symptoms and were doing uniformly well were labeled as “resilient”. Group 3 (n=14) was moderately high on mood and fatigue with few physiological symptoms, this group was labeled "latent”. Group 4 (n=19) was characterized by older men with moderately high urinary, bowel, and sexual symptoms with low mood scores. This group was labeled “adjusted” as they are further distinguished by their moderately high quality of life scores.  Significant differences were noted among the four clusters on participant characteristics. Implications: Results suggest men can be classified into clusters based on a profile of symptoms prior to prostate cancer radiation treatment and that these clusters can be further distinguished by additional variables including quality of life.  Findings from this study have important implications for the development of a tailored intervention for men with prostate cancer that would target the management of multiple symptoms while improving QOL. Lessening the symptom burden through intervention strategies that unravel the cluster is imperative in making the cancer experience more manageable. 
Keywords:
Cancer Patients; Symptoms
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
4521
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleBASELINE SYMPTOM CLUSTERS AMONG MEN UNDERGOING PROSTATE CANCER TREATMENTen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211452-
dc.description.abstractRationale/Purpose: Most individuals diagnosed with cancer do not report a single symptom; instead they have multiple symptoms associated with the disease and treatment. The interactive and cumulative effect of multiple symptoms adversely affects quality of life. Three or more symptoms which occur concurrently are called a symptom cluster.  The most common cancer diagnosed in men is prostate cancer and yet there is a paucity of information on the prostate cancer symptom experience. Even more limiting are findings on symptom clusters in men with prostate cancer who often experience general symptoms of fatigue, pain, insomnia, depression, and anxiety and specific treatment related symptoms (i.e., urinary, bowel and sexual). The purpose of this paper is to describe baseline symptoms and symptom clusters in men undergoing radiation treatment for prostate cancer. Methods: A sample of 84 men completed questionnaires which measured quality of life and the nine symptoms of interest prior to the start of radiation treatment. Participants had a mean age of 69 (SD=8.2), were predominately white (84%), and scheduled to begin radiation treatment. Some men were also receiving hormone therapy (38%). Gleason scores for the sample ranged from 5 to 10 (M=7.14, SD=1.0), with a mean PSA level at diagnosis of 8.6 ng/mL (SD=7.3 ng/mL).  All scales demonstrated good reliability and validity in prior studies with cancer patients. Latent profile analysis was used to identify subgroups of men similar to each other based on distinct symptom profiles. One-way ANOVAs with Tukey’s pairwise comparisons were conducted to determine if differences existed among the resulting clusters on quality of life and participant characteristics. Results: Four clusters of men were identified with significant differences in symptoms. Group 1 (n=3) which was labeled “overwhelmed’ included younger men who were consistently high on all symptoms. Group 2 (n=48) who reported little to no symptoms and were doing uniformly well were labeled as “resilient”. Group 3 (n=14) was moderately high on mood and fatigue with few physiological symptoms, this group was labeled "latent”. Group 4 (n=19) was characterized by older men with moderately high urinary, bowel, and sexual symptoms with low mood scores. This group was labeled “adjusted” as they are further distinguished by their moderately high quality of life scores.  Significant differences were noted among the four clusters on participant characteristics. Implications: Results suggest men can be classified into clusters based on a profile of symptoms prior to prostate cancer radiation treatment and that these clusters can be further distinguished by additional variables including quality of life.  Findings from this study have important implications for the development of a tailored intervention for men with prostate cancer that would target the management of multiple symptoms while improving QOL. Lessening the symptom burden through intervention strategies that unravel the cluster is imperative in making the cancer experience more manageable. en_GB
dc.subjectCancer Patientsen_GB
dc.subjectSymptomsen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T11:55:55Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T11:55:55Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T11:55:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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