2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211456
Type:
Research Study
Title:
PARENTS OF CHILDREN WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES MELLITUS: EXPERIENCES WITH SCHOOLS
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to discover parental perceptions of and experiences with  the school setting when raising a child/adolescent with type 1 diabetes (T1DM). Background: Type 1 diabetes requires lifestyle changes involving diet modification, blood glucose monitoring, carbohydrate counting, and insulin administration. Since children with T1DM spend a major portion of their waking hours at school, one of the major challenges faced by parents is issues surrounding management of diabetes in the school setting. Methods: The project was part of a larger study in which parents, siblings and CWD participated in focus groups, a type of participatory action research that combines interviewing and open discussion of common issues. Six separate focus groups were held over a four month period with a total of 21 parents representing 16 children with diabetes. Parents included 14 females (mean age 37.33, SD 9.35) and 7 males (mean age 39.67, SD 8.85) and the children ranged in age from 20 months to 17 years (mean 9.08, SD 3.78).The focus group discussions were audio recorded and then transcribed verbatim. The transcriptions were analyzed for common themes according to qualitative methodology. Results: School concerns were identified by participants and included: a) interaction with school administrators and teachers, b) Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, c) educating the child’s classmates, d) school lunch, and e) physical education classes.  Interactions with school administrators and teachers included resistance to insulin administration and intolerance of mood swings caused by blood glucose fluctuations. Utilization of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act was misunderstood by both parents and school personnel; parents did not realize this act could be helpful and school personnel rarely used the act when evaluating the children/adolescents. Educating the child’s classmates was important to parents who wanted other students to be knowledgeable about TIDM and issues related to managing the disease they may experience with the child. Concerns about school lunches included scheduling, preparation needed prior to lunch and the food provided. Finally, parents were concerned that physical education classes precipitated low blood glucose that needs immediate attention and the child and teachers needed to be prepared to treat/prevent hypoglycemia if and when it occurred. Implications: Family and Pediatric Nurses Practitioners need to be aware of the challenges their patients with T1DM face in relation to schools. They should assume an active role in advocating for improved diabetes management in schools, participate in the initiation of a 504 plan, and provide support that can have educational and health benefits. They should also encourage parents of children with T1DM to involve school personnel in designing and administering an appropriate diabetes management plan.
Keywords:
Parental perceptions; Juvenile diabetes; School setting
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5147
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titlePARENTS OF CHILDREN WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES MELLITUS: EXPERIENCES WITH SCHOOLSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211456-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to discover parental perceptions of and experiences with  the school setting when raising a child/adolescent with type 1 diabetes (T1DM). Background: Type 1 diabetes requires lifestyle changes involving diet modification, blood glucose monitoring, carbohydrate counting, and insulin administration. Since children with T1DM spend a major portion of their waking hours at school, one of the major challenges faced by parents is issues surrounding management of diabetes in the school setting. Methods: The project was part of a larger study in which parents, siblings and CWD participated in focus groups, a type of participatory action research that combines interviewing and open discussion of common issues. Six separate focus groups were held over a four month period with a total of 21 parents representing 16 children with diabetes. Parents included 14 females (mean age 37.33, SD 9.35) and 7 males (mean age 39.67, SD 8.85) and the children ranged in age from 20 months to 17 years (mean 9.08, SD 3.78).The focus group discussions were audio recorded and then transcribed verbatim. The transcriptions were analyzed for common themes according to qualitative methodology. Results: School concerns were identified by participants and included: a) interaction with school administrators and teachers, b) Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, c) educating the child’s classmates, d) school lunch, and e) physical education classes.  Interactions with school administrators and teachers included resistance to insulin administration and intolerance of mood swings caused by blood glucose fluctuations. Utilization of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act was misunderstood by both parents and school personnel; parents did not realize this act could be helpful and school personnel rarely used the act when evaluating the children/adolescents. Educating the child’s classmates was important to parents who wanted other students to be knowledgeable about TIDM and issues related to managing the disease they may experience with the child. Concerns about school lunches included scheduling, preparation needed prior to lunch and the food provided. Finally, parents were concerned that physical education classes precipitated low blood glucose that needs immediate attention and the child and teachers needed to be prepared to treat/prevent hypoglycemia if and when it occurred. Implications: Family and Pediatric Nurses Practitioners need to be aware of the challenges their patients with T1DM face in relation to schools. They should assume an active role in advocating for improved diabetes management in schools, participate in the initiation of a 504 plan, and provide support that can have educational and health benefits. They should also encourage parents of children with T1DM to involve school personnel in designing and administering an appropriate diabetes management plan.en_GB
dc.subjectParental perceptionsen_GB
dc.subjectJuvenile diabetesen_GB
dc.subjectSchool settingen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T11:56:10Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T11:56:10Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T11:56:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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