2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211459
Type:
Research Study
Title:
DEPRESSION AND INFLAMMATORY BIOMARKERS AFTER CARDIAC SURGERY
Abstract:
Aim: To describe the course of inflammation over the first 3 postoperative months in depressed cardiac surgery patients involved in a randomized controlled trial of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). Background: Inflammatory markers (C-reactive protein [CRP]); interleukin [IL]-6) have been shown to predict adverse outcomes in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and are also positively associated with depression. While both CRP and IL-6 are increased immediately after cardiac surgery and decrease in the perioperative period, little is known about the later course of inflammatory markers. Methods: We enrolled 808 cardiac surgery patients from five hospitals. They were screened for depressive symptoms with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) in the hospital and one month later and interviewed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID-I); those who met criteria for clinical depression (n=62; 26% female, age 63  9.7 years) were randomized to CBT (n=32) or UC (n=30).  CBT patients received 8 weeks of nurse-guided therapy. UC patients received usual postop care plus biweekly phone calls to maintain contact. After 8 weeks, clinical depression in both groups was re-evaluated. Serum samples were collected during the SCID-I and after 8 weeks in both groups and biweekly during therapy in the CBT group.  Samples were analyzed in a core laboratory by ELISA for high-sensitivity CRP and IL-6. Using general linear modeling and controlling for the time from surgery, we conducted repeated measures analysis to compare the change over time in inflammatory markers. Results: CRP and IL-6 decreased significantly in both groups during the first 3 months after surgery. However, the change over time did not differ between treatment groups. Implications: This study is the first to provide evidence that reductions in inflammation continue for up to three months after cardiac surgery in depressed patients. Further study is needed to evaluate the relationship of decreased inflammation to CAD progression and treatment.
Keywords:
Cardiac surgery patients; Depression; Inflammation
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5155
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleDEPRESSION AND INFLAMMATORY BIOMARKERS AFTER CARDIAC SURGERYen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211459-
dc.description.abstractAim: To describe the course of inflammation over the first 3 postoperative months in depressed cardiac surgery patients involved in a randomized controlled trial of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). Background: Inflammatory markers (C-reactive protein [CRP]); interleukin [IL]-6) have been shown to predict adverse outcomes in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and are also positively associated with depression. While both CRP and IL-6 are increased immediately after cardiac surgery and decrease in the perioperative period, little is known about the later course of inflammatory markers. Methods: We enrolled 808 cardiac surgery patients from five hospitals. They were screened for depressive symptoms with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) in the hospital and one month later and interviewed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID-I); those who met criteria for clinical depression (n=62; 26% female, age 63  9.7 years) were randomized to CBT (n=32) or UC (n=30).  CBT patients received 8 weeks of nurse-guided therapy. UC patients received usual postop care plus biweekly phone calls to maintain contact. After 8 weeks, clinical depression in both groups was re-evaluated. Serum samples were collected during the SCID-I and after 8 weeks in both groups and biweekly during therapy in the CBT group.  Samples were analyzed in a core laboratory by ELISA for high-sensitivity CRP and IL-6. Using general linear modeling and controlling for the time from surgery, we conducted repeated measures analysis to compare the change over time in inflammatory markers. Results: CRP and IL-6 decreased significantly in both groups during the first 3 months after surgery. However, the change over time did not differ between treatment groups. Implications: This study is the first to provide evidence that reductions in inflammation continue for up to three months after cardiac surgery in depressed patients. Further study is needed to evaluate the relationship of decreased inflammation to CAD progression and treatment.en_GB
dc.subjectCardiac surgery patientsen_GB
dc.subjectDepressionen_GB
dc.subjectInflammationen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T11:56:21Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T11:56:21Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T11:56:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.