2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211460
Type:
Research Study
Title:
LEADING THE WAY: LATINO DAY LABORER HEALTH PROMOTORS
Abstract:
Purpose: This study builds on previous Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) by this researcher with Latino day laborer families to explore implementation and evaluation of community identified action strategies. The purpose of this study was to 1) explore the health concerns of Latino day laborer men including resources accessed and barriers encountered in seeking healthcare and 2) implement community identified change strategy of day laborer health navigators/promoters, specifically Latino male health promoters, and 3) evaluate the perceived effectiveness of Latino day laborer health promoters. Background: Latinos immigrants are the largest, fastest growing group of immigrants in the U.S., estimated to be 15% of the population.  Health disparities are evident for Latino immigrant families as they are less likely to have access to healthcare.  Sub-populations of Latino families working in low wage jobs, such as day laborers, may be particularly vulnerable through the experience of economic difficulty and unstable living conditions related to the nature of their work. Previous CBPR by this researcher with Latino day laborer parents revealed difficulty accessing care and strategies for change including use of lay health promoters.   Lay health promoters have been demonstrated to be effective in the Latino community.  Most lay health promoters are women.  Minimal evidence can be found regarding the use of male health promoters for health navigation and access to care. Methods: This research partnered with two community organizations, a day laborer center and a community clinic, to gather a baseline assessment of health access and health needs for Latino day laborer men, implement health promoter training, and evaluate post implementation.  A focus group of day laborer men (N= 16) was conducted and a brief survey of current health status, current health care access, health care insurance and demographic information was completed.  Participants interested in health promoter training (N=3) were identified by site personal and enrolled in an onsite health promoter training course of 10 one hour sessions.  Following completion of health promotion training and implementation of health promoter role at the site, a focus group will be conducted to evaluate the day laborer community perception of the health promoter role and activities.  Interviews will be conducted with the health promoters regarding training and effectiveness of their role. Results: Analysis of focus group data and baseline survey data reveals limited use of healthcare by Latino day laborers. In response to personal illness, the Latino day laborers participants most commonly reported that they “aguantarlo” or endure the problem. Themes identified included 1)   use and distrust of non-licensed health providers, 2) difficulty with healthcare access,3) concern for family members, and 4)support from peers. Health promoter training is in progress and data post implementation will be analyzed on completion. Implications: This study informs the understanding of strategies to improve health of day laborer families, specifically through the use of male health promoters. Improving the health of the Latino day laborer men benefits the families of the day laborers through decreased loss of work days, increased economic potential and increase in quality of life for the family.  
Keywords:
Latino day laborers; Men; Healthcare access
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5156
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleLEADING THE WAY: LATINO DAY LABORER HEALTH PROMOTORSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211460-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This study builds on previous Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) by this researcher with Latino day laborer families to explore implementation and evaluation of community identified action strategies. The purpose of this study was to 1) explore the health concerns of Latino day laborer men including resources accessed and barriers encountered in seeking healthcare and 2) implement community identified change strategy of day laborer health navigators/promoters, specifically Latino male health promoters, and 3) evaluate the perceived effectiveness of Latino day laborer health promoters. Background: Latinos immigrants are the largest, fastest growing group of immigrants in the U.S., estimated to be 15% of the population.  Health disparities are evident for Latino immigrant families as they are less likely to have access to healthcare.  Sub-populations of Latino families working in low wage jobs, such as day laborers, may be particularly vulnerable through the experience of economic difficulty and unstable living conditions related to the nature of their work. Previous CBPR by this researcher with Latino day laborer parents revealed difficulty accessing care and strategies for change including use of lay health promoters.   Lay health promoters have been demonstrated to be effective in the Latino community.  Most lay health promoters are women.  Minimal evidence can be found regarding the use of male health promoters for health navigation and access to care. Methods: This research partnered with two community organizations, a day laborer center and a community clinic, to gather a baseline assessment of health access and health needs for Latino day laborer men, implement health promoter training, and evaluate post implementation.  A focus group of day laborer men (N= 16) was conducted and a brief survey of current health status, current health care access, health care insurance and demographic information was completed.  Participants interested in health promoter training (N=3) were identified by site personal and enrolled in an onsite health promoter training course of 10 one hour sessions.  Following completion of health promotion training and implementation of health promoter role at the site, a focus group will be conducted to evaluate the day laborer community perception of the health promoter role and activities.  Interviews will be conducted with the health promoters regarding training and effectiveness of their role. Results: Analysis of focus group data and baseline survey data reveals limited use of healthcare by Latino day laborers. In response to personal illness, the Latino day laborers participants most commonly reported that they “aguantarlo” or endure the problem. Themes identified included 1)   use and distrust of non-licensed health providers, 2) difficulty with healthcare access,3) concern for family members, and 4)support from peers. Health promoter training is in progress and data post implementation will be analyzed on completion. Implications: This study informs the understanding of strategies to improve health of day laborer families, specifically through the use of male health promoters. Improving the health of the Latino day laborer men benefits the families of the day laborers through decreased loss of work days, increased economic potential and increase in quality of life for the family.  en_GB
dc.subjectLatino day laborersen_GB
dc.subjectMenen_GB
dc.subjectHealthcare accessen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T11:56:25Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T11:56:25Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T11:56:25Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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