Teaching and Learning in the Workplace: Staff Nurses Experiences of Clinical Learning

10.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211464
Type:
Research Study
Title:
Teaching and Learning in the Workplace: Staff Nurses Experiences of Clinical Learning
Abstract:
Purpose: To explore obstetrical staff nurses’ unique experiences  of working with nursing students in a busy, complex, and dynamic workplace. Background: The clinical learning experience is integral to nursing education and preparation for professional nursing practice. Several models of clinical learning rely on staff nurses for clinical teaching.  The nursing shortage, shortened length of patient stay, increased patient acuity and heavy clinical workloads can create stressful environments and may influence how staff nurses supervise, teach and provide learning opportunities for nursing students.  Therefore, Nurse Educators (NEs) should not assume all nurses who work with students are able to provide a positive learning experience. Methods: Using a Naturalistic Inquiry approach a purposeful sample of 12 obstetrical staff nurses participated in one-to-one semi-structured interviews to share their experiences of working with nursing students.  A constant comparative method was used to inductively analyze the data. Results: A significant finding is that staff nurses disclosed that their work with nursing students is primarily focused on providing nursing care for patients rather than achieving academic objectives. Several nurses report that often they are unaware of the specific learning objectives for the students. Six themes emerged from analysis of the semi-structured interviews: 1) Giving and Receiving:  Working with students provided these nurses opportunities  to “give back” to the nursing profession and, in turn, they learn new evidenced-based practice from students; 2) Advancing Professionally and Personally: Many nurses take advantage of workplace incentives, such as the clinical ladder to gain additional financial compensation and educational opportunities from their employer;  3) Balancing Act: Nurses revealed working with students requires them to balance their typical workload and patient care with students' learning needs. Working with students slows nurses down, especially if students are unprepared for clinical or demonstrate a lack of interest in obstetrical nursing; 4) Getting to Know and Working with You:  Most nurses take time to establish personal relationships with students and determine how best to work with students; 5) Past and Present: Clinical experiences exert powerful and long lasting impressions. Nurses report using similar positive strategies they recall from their own clinical experiences as a student and ,likewise, vow they would never  treat  students in the negative ways  they were treated;   and 6)  Gender (may) Matter: Under certain conditions the students’ gender is  a barrier to their learning experiences such as when male students are excluded. Implications: Study findings suggest NEs should not assume student learning is focused or intentional in the clinical setting. NEs who establish strong collaborative working relationships with staff nurses increase the likelihood that student learning is enhanced and objectives are met. NEs should work with administrators to advocate and explore creative ways to compensate and recognize nurses who work with nursing students.
Keywords:
Obstetrical staff nurses; Nursing students; Clinical learning experience
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5186
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleTeaching and Learning in the Workplace: Staff Nurses Experiences of Clinical Learningen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211464-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To explore obstetrical staff nurses’ unique experiences  of working with nursing students in a busy, complex, and dynamic workplace. Background: The clinical learning experience is integral to nursing education and preparation for professional nursing practice. Several models of clinical learning rely on staff nurses for clinical teaching.  The nursing shortage, shortened length of patient stay, increased patient acuity and heavy clinical workloads can create stressful environments and may influence how staff nurses supervise, teach and provide learning opportunities for nursing students.  Therefore, Nurse Educators (NEs) should not assume all nurses who work with students are able to provide a positive learning experience. Methods: Using a Naturalistic Inquiry approach a purposeful sample of 12 obstetrical staff nurses participated in one-to-one semi-structured interviews to share their experiences of working with nursing students.  A constant comparative method was used to inductively analyze the data. Results: A significant finding is that staff nurses disclosed that their work with nursing students is primarily focused on providing nursing care for patients rather than achieving academic objectives. Several nurses report that often they are unaware of the specific learning objectives for the students. Six themes emerged from analysis of the semi-structured interviews: 1) Giving and Receiving:  Working with students provided these nurses opportunities  to “give back” to the nursing profession and, in turn, they learn new evidenced-based practice from students; 2) Advancing Professionally and Personally: Many nurses take advantage of workplace incentives, such as the clinical ladder to gain additional financial compensation and educational opportunities from their employer;  3) Balancing Act: Nurses revealed working with students requires them to balance their typical workload and patient care with students' learning needs. Working with students slows nurses down, especially if students are unprepared for clinical or demonstrate a lack of interest in obstetrical nursing; 4) Getting to Know and Working with You:  Most nurses take time to establish personal relationships with students and determine how best to work with students; 5) Past and Present: Clinical experiences exert powerful and long lasting impressions. Nurses report using similar positive strategies they recall from their own clinical experiences as a student and ,likewise, vow they would never  treat  students in the negative ways  they were treated;   and 6)  Gender (may) Matter: Under certain conditions the students’ gender is  a barrier to their learning experiences such as when male students are excluded. Implications: Study findings suggest NEs should not assume student learning is focused or intentional in the clinical setting. NEs who establish strong collaborative working relationships with staff nurses increase the likelihood that student learning is enhanced and objectives are met. NEs should work with administrators to advocate and explore creative ways to compensate and recognize nurses who work with nursing students.en_GB
dc.subjectObstetrical staff nursesen_GB
dc.subjectNursing studentsen_GB
dc.subjectClinical learning experienceen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T11:56:40Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T11:56:40Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T11:56:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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