2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211465
Type:
Research Study
Title:
MENTORING: A WIN-WIN RELATIONSHIP FOR THE MENTOR AND MENTEE
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a hospital-based Mentoring Program in retaining new nurses in their positions while encouraging experienced nurse to make a fresh commitment to professionalism. Background: Healthcare organizations struggle with the best way to integrate new staff members into the organization. Turnover rates for new graduate nurses are estimated at 55% to 61% during the first year of practice (Casey, Fink, Krugman, & Propst, 2004) which is costly for the organization (Jones & Grates, 2007), as well as to the new graduate’s timely and successful transition into practice. Literature suggests that mentoring relationships may be the key to nurse’s success in practice and is further linked to professionalism and maintaining quality standards (Ronsten, Andersson, & Gustafsson, 2005). Additionally, research reinforces the importance of creating a mentoring environment that encourages individuals to want to become part of a profession, remain or return to the profession, and become or remain a member of a health care organization (Stewart, 2006).  Methods:  Expedited Institutional Board Review approval was obtained for a new mentoring program pilot study.  A descriptive design was used with a convenience sample of paired mentors (n=12) and mentees (n=12).  Instruments for this study included both quantitative and qualitative measures: Mentoring skills inventory (Zachary, 2000); pre and posttest evaluation survey to determine level of job satisfaction; journal entry reflective exercise; new graduate self-assessment of skills; and profiling of mentor and mentee to help in mentor – mentee matching. Mentors were recruited and paired with new graduate mentees through a self-selection process. Mentors and mentees completed an agreement that they would meet regularly over a 12 month period of time in face-to-face meetings, by telephone, texting, and email. An interactive lecture on the mentoring development program and expectations of mentors/mentees was conducted at the beginning of the program and several structured social events occurred over the year. Results: Eleven mentor-mentee relationships were established and all mentees remain employed a year after being hired.  Both mentors and mentees expressed increased job satisfaction over time and mentors repeatedly expressed how much they valued the mentor-mentee relationship in terms of sharing with each other and feeling connected to a greater purpose of mentoring the next generation of nurses.  Qualities of an effective mentor-mentee relationship were identified as well as difficulties and challenges in maintaining the relationship. Common areas of difficulty for mentors were in the areas of managing conflict and coaching. Mentees stated that the mentor-mentee relationship provided a “safety net” when the preceptor-preceptee relationship ended that helped smooth the transition to practice. Implications: Findings from this study suggest the importance and effectiveness of a mentoring relationship in invigorating seasoned staff and ensuring that new hires feel comfortable and accepted in the hospital environment and culture. Clearly, nurse mentoring is a progression that builds skills, increases job satisfaction, and ultimately encourages nurse retention.  Mentoring may provide a strategy to counteract workplace lateral violence and bullying and study findings provide direction in structuring mentoring programs for future hires.
Keywords:
Hospital-based mentoring program; New nurse retention
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5187
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleMENTORING: A WIN-WIN RELATIONSHIP FOR THE MENTOR AND MENTEEen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211465-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a hospital-based Mentoring Program in retaining new nurses in their positions while encouraging experienced nurse to make a fresh commitment to professionalism. Background: Healthcare organizations struggle with the best way to integrate new staff members into the organization. Turnover rates for new graduate nurses are estimated at 55% to 61% during the first year of practice (Casey, Fink, Krugman, & Propst, 2004) which is costly for the organization (Jones & Grates, 2007), as well as to the new graduate’s timely and successful transition into practice. Literature suggests that mentoring relationships may be the key to nurse’s success in practice and is further linked to professionalism and maintaining quality standards (Ronsten, Andersson, & Gustafsson, 2005). Additionally, research reinforces the importance of creating a mentoring environment that encourages individuals to want to become part of a profession, remain or return to the profession, and become or remain a member of a health care organization (Stewart, 2006).  Methods:  Expedited Institutional Board Review approval was obtained for a new mentoring program pilot study.  A descriptive design was used with a convenience sample of paired mentors (n=12) and mentees (n=12).  Instruments for this study included both quantitative and qualitative measures: Mentoring skills inventory (Zachary, 2000); pre and posttest evaluation survey to determine level of job satisfaction; journal entry reflective exercise; new graduate self-assessment of skills; and profiling of mentor and mentee to help in mentor – mentee matching. Mentors were recruited and paired with new graduate mentees through a self-selection process. Mentors and mentees completed an agreement that they would meet regularly over a 12 month period of time in face-to-face meetings, by telephone, texting, and email. An interactive lecture on the mentoring development program and expectations of mentors/mentees was conducted at the beginning of the program and several structured social events occurred over the year. Results: Eleven mentor-mentee relationships were established and all mentees remain employed a year after being hired.  Both mentors and mentees expressed increased job satisfaction over time and mentors repeatedly expressed how much they valued the mentor-mentee relationship in terms of sharing with each other and feeling connected to a greater purpose of mentoring the next generation of nurses.  Qualities of an effective mentor-mentee relationship were identified as well as difficulties and challenges in maintaining the relationship. Common areas of difficulty for mentors were in the areas of managing conflict and coaching. Mentees stated that the mentor-mentee relationship provided a “safety net” when the preceptor-preceptee relationship ended that helped smooth the transition to practice. Implications: Findings from this study suggest the importance and effectiveness of a mentoring relationship in invigorating seasoned staff and ensuring that new hires feel comfortable and accepted in the hospital environment and culture. Clearly, nurse mentoring is a progression that builds skills, increases job satisfaction, and ultimately encourages nurse retention.  Mentoring may provide a strategy to counteract workplace lateral violence and bullying and study findings provide direction in structuring mentoring programs for future hires.en_GB
dc.subjectHospital-based mentoring programen_GB
dc.subjectNew nurse retentionen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T11:56:44Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T11:56:44Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T11:56:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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