2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211469
Type:
Research Study
Title:
STRESS MANAGEMENT FOR NURSING STUDENTS- A PILOT FEASIBILITY AND EFFICACY STUDY
Abstract:
Aim: To determine the efficacy and feasibility of an educational program of mantram repetition on levels of perceived stress, quality of life, and empathy in nursing students delivered using teleconference calls over a 12-week period of time. Rationale: It is well documented that students in nursing education experience high levels of stress and anxiety. Common sources include: conflicting demands (school, home, and work), workload, lack of preparedness, fear of failure, fear of interpersonal nature of the clinical experience and time pressure. The clinical setting is stressful whether a learning or working environment (Tully, 2004). Studies suggest that high stress impedes concentration, memory, and problem solving ability which are all essential for clinical reasoning, successful learning and professional practice. Beyond these cognitive challenges, communication, empathy and caring, essential components of nursing, may also be hampered by stress. Therefore, nursing faculty have an obligation to assist nursing students in dealing with stress—for their own health, the health and wellbeing of the patients they care for, and the nursing profession as a whole. This study examined mantram repetition a simple, evidence-based tool for coping with stress by initiating the relaxation response (Bormann, 2006). This preliminary study examined both the methods for and the effects of delivering a stress management tool to nursing students. The study explored efficacy of mantram repetition and how well the selected methods of recruitment, teleconferencing delivery and data collection worked. Methodology: This study has a 2 group [intervention and control] by 4 time [pre-intervention, post-intervention (approximately 3 months), mid-program (approximately 1 year after program orientation), and end-program (approximately 2 years after orientation during last BSN class)] design. Participants self- referred at the orientation for the nursing program and were randomly assigned to either the intervention or control group. Results: Fifteen students have participated in the study. Data has been collected 3 times to date with the final data collection to be completed 10/31/11. Levels of perceived stress, quality of life, and empathy in nursing students will be examined after last data is collected. Lessons learned regarding delivery include: having sessions when students are already on campus enhances participation even when the resource is teleconferenced. Data collection also succeeds best when students are scheduled to be on campus and completing the surveys is made convenient. Implications: The results will help others to determine how to support students stress reduction. Future research should examine electronic methods of delivery and data collection.
Keywords:
Nursing education; Nursing students; Perceived stress
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5198
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleSTRESS MANAGEMENT FOR NURSING STUDENTS- A PILOT FEASIBILITY AND EFFICACY STUDYen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211469-
dc.description.abstractAim: To determine the efficacy and feasibility of an educational program of mantram repetition on levels of perceived stress, quality of life, and empathy in nursing students delivered using teleconference calls over a 12-week period of time. Rationale: It is well documented that students in nursing education experience high levels of stress and anxiety. Common sources include: conflicting demands (school, home, and work), workload, lack of preparedness, fear of failure, fear of interpersonal nature of the clinical experience and time pressure. The clinical setting is stressful whether a learning or working environment (Tully, 2004). Studies suggest that high stress impedes concentration, memory, and problem solving ability which are all essential for clinical reasoning, successful learning and professional practice. Beyond these cognitive challenges, communication, empathy and caring, essential components of nursing, may also be hampered by stress. Therefore, nursing faculty have an obligation to assist nursing students in dealing with stress—for their own health, the health and wellbeing of the patients they care for, and the nursing profession as a whole. This study examined mantram repetition a simple, evidence-based tool for coping with stress by initiating the relaxation response (Bormann, 2006). This preliminary study examined both the methods for and the effects of delivering a stress management tool to nursing students. The study explored efficacy of mantram repetition and how well the selected methods of recruitment, teleconferencing delivery and data collection worked. Methodology: This study has a 2 group [intervention and control] by 4 time [pre-intervention, post-intervention (approximately 3 months), mid-program (approximately 1 year after program orientation), and end-program (approximately 2 years after orientation during last BSN class)] design. Participants self- referred at the orientation for the nursing program and were randomly assigned to either the intervention or control group. Results: Fifteen students have participated in the study. Data has been collected 3 times to date with the final data collection to be completed 10/31/11. Levels of perceived stress, quality of life, and empathy in nursing students will be examined after last data is collected. Lessons learned regarding delivery include: having sessions when students are already on campus enhances participation even when the resource is teleconferenced. Data collection also succeeds best when students are scheduled to be on campus and completing the surveys is made convenient. Implications: The results will help others to determine how to support students stress reduction. Future research should examine electronic methods of delivery and data collection.en_GB
dc.subjectNursing educationen_GB
dc.subjectNursing studentsen_GB
dc.subjectPerceived stressen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T11:56:58Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T11:56:58Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T11:56:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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