2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211471
Type:
Research Study
Title:
COMMUNITY THEMES AND STRENGTHS ASSESSMENT
Abstract:
Purpose: The project completed the Community Themes and Strengths Assessment, one phase of the Mobilizing for Action through Planning and Partnerships (MAPP), a strategic planning framework for improving community health. This phase is a qualitative assessment of the community’s perceptions of issues of importance, health related quality of life, and resources available to improve health. Background: Clark County, Nevada includes Las Vegas and surrounding areas, with a combined population of approximately 2 million (and 36 million visitors a year). The Las Vegas area fares poorly in most health indicators, such as high school graduation rate, chronic disease morbidity and mortality, suicides, and access to health care. The Southern Nevada Health District (SNHD) partnered with the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) to begin a comprehensive community assessment as a foundation for improving population health. Methods: The qualitative study involved two phases. The first was holding two large group meetings for community leaders from a wide variety of community agencies and sectors (n= 62) using the Technology of Participation (ToP) method to ensure that the meetings were conducted efficiently. The ToP method involves small group work, then consensus building sessions. In addition, participants were asked to complete a 12 question, quantitative Quality of Life Survey. The second phase entailed conducting two focus groups (n=12) with community sectors not represented in the large group meetings.  Data were analyzed for themes using NVivo 9. Results: The following themes emerged in both group meetings, as well as in focus groups. Participants ranked their current status as “poor,” except for public safety, which they ranked “okay.” 1) Built environment; 2) Community engagement; 3) Diversified economy; 4) Education (access, commitment, quality); 5) Healthcare (access, quality, continuity); 6) Public safety. Other characteristics of a healthy community identified included good government, cultural opportunities, health public policies, social services, provision of public services at an adequate level, recreation, and beauty in the natural environment. Again, most were judged of poor quality. In addition, participants were able to identify long lists of assets. Recurrent themes were good weather, demographic diversity, wealthy individuals, name recognition for Las Vegas, casinos, faith community, certain charities, SNHD, Hoover Dam, the air force base, and celebrities. The results from the Quality of Life Survey indicate that respondents (n=57) rated Southern Nevada as a mean 2.5 on a scale of 1 – 5 (worst to best) for achieving the benchmarks of a healthy community. Conclusions:  In many ways, this was a visioning process, with participants describing the type of community they would find ideal. This was also an educational process for attendees who had little previous experience with community assessment. Participants were able to identify themes important to the community and ranked them as below average, giving the SNHD direction for future assessments and interventions. The large number and variety of assets offer possible resources for community health improvement.  Based on the findings, the SNHD and UNLV created a white paper: “Vision for an Engaged, Educated, and Healthy Community.”
Keywords:
Community health improvement - strategic planning
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5204
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleCOMMUNITY THEMES AND STRENGTHS ASSESSMENTen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211471-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The project completed the Community Themes and Strengths Assessment, one phase of the Mobilizing for Action through Planning and Partnerships (MAPP), a strategic planning framework for improving community health. This phase is a qualitative assessment of the community’s perceptions of issues of importance, health related quality of life, and resources available to improve health. Background: Clark County, Nevada includes Las Vegas and surrounding areas, with a combined population of approximately 2 million (and 36 million visitors a year). The Las Vegas area fares poorly in most health indicators, such as high school graduation rate, chronic disease morbidity and mortality, suicides, and access to health care. The Southern Nevada Health District (SNHD) partnered with the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) to begin a comprehensive community assessment as a foundation for improving population health. Methods: The qualitative study involved two phases. The first was holding two large group meetings for community leaders from a wide variety of community agencies and sectors (n= 62) using the Technology of Participation (ToP) method to ensure that the meetings were conducted efficiently. The ToP method involves small group work, then consensus building sessions. In addition, participants were asked to complete a 12 question, quantitative Quality of Life Survey. The second phase entailed conducting two focus groups (n=12) with community sectors not represented in the large group meetings.  Data were analyzed for themes using NVivo 9. Results: The following themes emerged in both group meetings, as well as in focus groups. Participants ranked their current status as “poor,” except for public safety, which they ranked “okay.” 1) Built environment; 2) Community engagement; 3) Diversified economy; 4) Education (access, commitment, quality); 5) Healthcare (access, quality, continuity); 6) Public safety. Other characteristics of a healthy community identified included good government, cultural opportunities, health public policies, social services, provision of public services at an adequate level, recreation, and beauty in the natural environment. Again, most were judged of poor quality. In addition, participants were able to identify long lists of assets. Recurrent themes were good weather, demographic diversity, wealthy individuals, name recognition for Las Vegas, casinos, faith community, certain charities, SNHD, Hoover Dam, the air force base, and celebrities. The results from the Quality of Life Survey indicate that respondents (n=57) rated Southern Nevada as a mean 2.5 on a scale of 1 – 5 (worst to best) for achieving the benchmarks of a healthy community. Conclusions:  In many ways, this was a visioning process, with participants describing the type of community they would find ideal. This was also an educational process for attendees who had little previous experience with community assessment. Participants were able to identify themes important to the community and ranked them as below average, giving the SNHD direction for future assessments and interventions. The large number and variety of assets offer possible resources for community health improvement.  Based on the findings, the SNHD and UNLV created a white paper: “Vision for an Engaged, Educated, and Healthy Community.”en_GB
dc.subjectCommunity health improvement - strategic planningen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T11:57:05Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T11:57:05Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T11:57:05Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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