2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211473
Type:
Research Study
Title:
USING COMMUNITY BASED RESEARCH TO ASSESS MEDICAL VULNERABILITY IN THE HOMELESS
Abstract:
Purpose. The aim of this study is to assess the level of medical vulnerability of the chronically homeless in a Northwest neighborhood to determine the need for additional and/or enhanced health care and social services. Background. People who are in chronically poor health are considered to be medically vulnerable and as such, frequently suffer from a decline in quality of life and access to adequate health care services (Knickman & Hunt, 2003).  Because of their living arrangements and lack of access to health care services, a larger proportion of homeless people are typically medically vulnerable as compared to the general population.  In addition, people who are homeless have a higher mortality rate when compared to other low socioeconomic groups with the same medical diagnosis (Hwang et al, 1998). It has been the research team’s observation that the homeless population residing in the target neighborhood tends to be older and thus may have higher levels of chronic illness and associated morbidity. In order to design relevant health care services for this community, an assessment of demographics and medical vulnerability is being performed with the local homeless population. Methods. The Vulnerability Index (VI) survey (Hwang et al, 1998) is used to rank the community’s most medically vulnerable homeless individuals’ by identifying their health and social status and risk factors.  The survey has been used extensively with homeless populations throughout the United States.  The VI takes approximately 20 minutes to administer and asks questions such as “What is the total length of time you have lived on the streets or shelters?” and “Where do you usually go for healthcare or when you’re not feeling well?”.  This community based participatory research project builds upon collaborative relationships between the XX Mennonite Church, XX School of Nursing, and the Neighborhood Taskforce on Homelessness, who represent multiple stakeholders from throughout community.  In keeping with the principals of community based participatory research, graduate research assistants are paired with members of the community who are formerly homeless, to conduct the surveys.  The teams will interview approximately thirty chronically homeless men and women residing within the neighborhood. Results. Data collection and concurrent data analysis are in progress. Implications. The data from this study will be used to design sustainable medical and nursing services that meet the needs of the homeless people and other stakeholders in the community. 
Keywords:
Homeless, access to care
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5219
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleUSING COMMUNITY BASED RESEARCH TO ASSESS MEDICAL VULNERABILITY IN THE HOMELESSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211473-
dc.description.abstractPurpose. The aim of this study is to assess the level of medical vulnerability of the chronically homeless in a Northwest neighborhood to determine the need for additional and/or enhanced health care and social services. Background. People who are in chronically poor health are considered to be medically vulnerable and as such, frequently suffer from a decline in quality of life and access to adequate health care services (Knickman & Hunt, 2003).  Because of their living arrangements and lack of access to health care services, a larger proportion of homeless people are typically medically vulnerable as compared to the general population.  In addition, people who are homeless have a higher mortality rate when compared to other low socioeconomic groups with the same medical diagnosis (Hwang et al, 1998). It has been the research team’s observation that the homeless population residing in the target neighborhood tends to be older and thus may have higher levels of chronic illness and associated morbidity. In order to design relevant health care services for this community, an assessment of demographics and medical vulnerability is being performed with the local homeless population. Methods. The Vulnerability Index (VI) survey (Hwang et al, 1998) is used to rank the community’s most medically vulnerable homeless individuals’ by identifying their health and social status and risk factors.  The survey has been used extensively with homeless populations throughout the United States.  The VI takes approximately 20 minutes to administer and asks questions such as “What is the total length of time you have lived on the streets or shelters?” and “Where do you usually go for healthcare or when you’re not feeling well?”.  This community based participatory research project builds upon collaborative relationships between the XX Mennonite Church, XX School of Nursing, and the Neighborhood Taskforce on Homelessness, who represent multiple stakeholders from throughout community.  In keeping with the principals of community based participatory research, graduate research assistants are paired with members of the community who are formerly homeless, to conduct the surveys.  The teams will interview approximately thirty chronically homeless men and women residing within the neighborhood. Results. Data collection and concurrent data analysis are in progress. Implications. The data from this study will be used to design sustainable medical and nursing services that meet the needs of the homeless people and other stakeholders in the community. en_GB
dc.subjectHomeless, access to careen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T11:57:13Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T11:57:13Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T11:57:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.