COMPETENCY LEVELS AND WORK ENVIRONMENTS in MILITARY AND CIVILIAN PERIOPERATIVE NURSES

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211474
Type:
Research Study
Title:
COMPETENCY LEVELS AND WORK ENVIRONMENTS in MILITARY AND CIVILIAN PERIOPERATIVE NURSES
Abstract:
Primary Purpose: Compare the competency levels, work environments and selected demographic characteristics of military and civilian nurses in the sub-specialty of perioperative nursing. Secondary Purpose: Ascertain which of the Independent Variables identified in the literature as possible influences on perioperative nursing competency were predictive of that competency. Background: Recent research has explored the correlation between the nursing work environment and patient outcomes. Attributes of the nursing work environment also influence the clinical learning of registered nurses and the resulting competency levels. This competency level, which is increasingly being scrutinized by regulatory agencies and others, also influences patient outcomes but this relationship has not been as extensively explored. This study examined the self-assessed competency levels, work environments, sub-specialty training and selected demographic characteristics of two groups – civilian and military (United States Navy) perioperative nurses. The Nurse Competence Scale (NCS) was used to assess competency levels and the Practice Environment Scale – Nursing Work Index (PES-NWI) was used to assess the nursing work environment. Demographic characteristics including years of experience, educational level and type of sub-specialty training were gathered and comparisons were made between the groups. Patricia Benner’s Novice to Expert Theory served as the theoretical framework. The influence of the unique perioperative nursing work environment upon the competence level of nurses was a focus of the study. Methods: A cross-sectional non-equivalent comparison group design was used. Bivariate and multivariate statistical methods were used to determine which of the Independent Variables predicted perioperative nursing competency. Results: A t-test was used to compare the competency levels and work environment scores. The overall mean scores of the NCS were significantly higher in the Navy subjects (82.8 vs. 78.8, p=.038). On the PES-NWI the Navy nurses had higher overall scores (2.95 vs. 2.77, p=.01). Using a Linear Regression Model, group was a significant predictor of competency as measured the NCS. Navy nurses are predicted to score 7.5 points higher than the civilians (p = .003). Using the Cronbach’s alpha all NCS sub-scales showed reliability in the good to excellent range (≥.8). All PES-NWI sub-scales also demonstrated adequate reliability with scores ranging from .757 to .886. The Navy nurses had higher mean scores for each NCS sub-scale and each PES-NWI sub-scale except Work Role. A statistically significant difference was found in 3 NCS and 2 PES-NWI sub-scales. Implications: The NCS and PES-NWI show promise for further research in perioperative nurses. The potential exists to alter the nursing work environment and training methods for this sub-specialty and thus effect nursing competency and then patient and nurse outcomes. Further research is warranted with larger, more diverse samples. Additional characteristics and traits to include demographic factors that may contribute to nursing competency should also be explored as only 11% of the variability of the NCS score was explained by the Independent Variables of this study.  The influence of the nurse manager upon the competency of perioperative nurses merits further study.
Keywords:
Military Nursing; Perioperative Care nursing
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
4532
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleCOMPETENCY LEVELS AND WORK ENVIRONMENTS in MILITARY AND CIVILIAN PERIOPERATIVE NURSESen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211474-
dc.description.abstractPrimary Purpose: Compare the competency levels, work environments and selected demographic characteristics of military and civilian nurses in the sub-specialty of perioperative nursing. Secondary Purpose: Ascertain which of the Independent Variables identified in the literature as possible influences on perioperative nursing competency were predictive of that competency. Background: Recent research has explored the correlation between the nursing work environment and patient outcomes. Attributes of the nursing work environment also influence the clinical learning of registered nurses and the resulting competency levels. This competency level, which is increasingly being scrutinized by regulatory agencies and others, also influences patient outcomes but this relationship has not been as extensively explored. This study examined the self-assessed competency levels, work environments, sub-specialty training and selected demographic characteristics of two groups – civilian and military (United States Navy) perioperative nurses. The Nurse Competence Scale (NCS) was used to assess competency levels and the Practice Environment Scale – Nursing Work Index (PES-NWI) was used to assess the nursing work environment. Demographic characteristics including years of experience, educational level and type of sub-specialty training were gathered and comparisons were made between the groups. Patricia Benner’s Novice to Expert Theory served as the theoretical framework. The influence of the unique perioperative nursing work environment upon the competence level of nurses was a focus of the study. Methods: A cross-sectional non-equivalent comparison group design was used. Bivariate and multivariate statistical methods were used to determine which of the Independent Variables predicted perioperative nursing competency. Results: A t-test was used to compare the competency levels and work environment scores. The overall mean scores of the NCS were significantly higher in the Navy subjects (82.8 vs. 78.8, p=.038). On the PES-NWI the Navy nurses had higher overall scores (2.95 vs. 2.77, p=.01). Using a Linear Regression Model, group was a significant predictor of competency as measured the NCS. Navy nurses are predicted to score 7.5 points higher than the civilians (p = .003). Using the Cronbach’s alpha all NCS sub-scales showed reliability in the good to excellent range (≥.8). All PES-NWI sub-scales also demonstrated adequate reliability with scores ranging from .757 to .886. The Navy nurses had higher mean scores for each NCS sub-scale and each PES-NWI sub-scale except Work Role. A statistically significant difference was found in 3 NCS and 2 PES-NWI sub-scales. Implications: The NCS and PES-NWI show promise for further research in perioperative nurses. The potential exists to alter the nursing work environment and training methods for this sub-specialty and thus effect nursing competency and then patient and nurse outcomes. Further research is warranted with larger, more diverse samples. Additional characteristics and traits to include demographic factors that may contribute to nursing competency should also be explored as only 11% of the variability of the NCS score was explained by the Independent Variables of this study.  The influence of the nurse manager upon the competency of perioperative nurses merits further study.en_GB
dc.subjectMilitary Nursingen_GB
dc.subjectPerioperative Care nursingen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T11:57:16Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T11:57:16Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T11:57:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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