2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211476
Type:
Research Study
Title:
TELEHEALTH FOR ADULT FAMILY HOMES: STATE OF TECHNOLOGY USAGE
Abstract:
Purpose/Aim: The purpose of this study is to assess the different types of technology in use in adult family homes in order to better design tools that will enhance care in these settings. Rationale/ Background: America’s current health care system is unable to meet the health care needs of our aging population.  This shortfall is becoming increasingly pronounced due to diminishing resources and a lack of nurses trained in gerontology.  Beyond the need for competency in caring for older adults in hospitals, nurses also need critical thinking skills to provide nursing care oversight for community dwelling vulnerable older adults.  Older adults prefer to age in place in home-like environments.  One residential setting that is meeting varying levels of care needs of many community dwelling older adults is the adult family home (AFH).  However, limited research on care giving has been done in this setting and there is a need for innovative solutions that will address the challenge of reduced resources.  A progressive solution for extending limited health care resources is telehealth, using real-time audio-video conferencing to bridge geographic distance.  Such an approach could potentially be beneficial for AFH settings as well.  There is however, minimal data on types of technology being used, learning needs of direct caregivers, and best model of community-based nursing oversight of care practices.  This project remedies the lack of evidence by assessing current technology usage in adult family homes and learning needs of caregivers for frail older adult residents in this setting. Methods: Cross sectional descriptive design was employed to survey technology usage and potential learning needs of AFH operators in Washington State.  The study was approved by the Institutional Review Board at the researcher’s affiliated University.  Using the Delphi technique, a survey was designed to assess technology usage and pain assessment learning needs of AFH caregivers.  The survey was mailed with a letter of introduction to all AFHs listed by the Washington State Department of Social and Health Services (n=2848).  Completed anonymous surveys were returned via self addressed postage paid envelopes to the researcher (response rate =12.1%). Results: Preliminary findings indicate diverse profiles of technology usage in AFHs.  Most homes have plain old telephone land lines (POTS) (98%) and cellular phones (96%).  Less than half of the respondents (40%) have used telehealth and approximately one-third (30%) have used real-time audio-video voice over internet protocol (VoIP).  In addition to communication technologies, preliminary findings indicate over one-third of respondent AFH (39%) use health monitoring devices as part of resident care. Conclusions/Implications: The results of this study inform the development of community-driven curriculum for care of diverse community dwelling vulnerable older adults in settings such as adult family homes.  This study also informs development of service learning strategies and care delivery programs that use telehealth in the AFH setting.
Keywords:
Adult families; Health care; Technology use
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5238
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleTELEHEALTH FOR ADULT FAMILY HOMES: STATE OF TECHNOLOGY USAGEen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211476-
dc.description.abstractPurpose/Aim: The purpose of this study is to assess the different types of technology in use in adult family homes in order to better design tools that will enhance care in these settings. Rationale/ Background: America’s current health care system is unable to meet the health care needs of our aging population.  This shortfall is becoming increasingly pronounced due to diminishing resources and a lack of nurses trained in gerontology.  Beyond the need for competency in caring for older adults in hospitals, nurses also need critical thinking skills to provide nursing care oversight for community dwelling vulnerable older adults.  Older adults prefer to age in place in home-like environments.  One residential setting that is meeting varying levels of care needs of many community dwelling older adults is the adult family home (AFH).  However, limited research on care giving has been done in this setting and there is a need for innovative solutions that will address the challenge of reduced resources.  A progressive solution for extending limited health care resources is telehealth, using real-time audio-video conferencing to bridge geographic distance.  Such an approach could potentially be beneficial for AFH settings as well.  There is however, minimal data on types of technology being used, learning needs of direct caregivers, and best model of community-based nursing oversight of care practices.  This project remedies the lack of evidence by assessing current technology usage in adult family homes and learning needs of caregivers for frail older adult residents in this setting. Methods: Cross sectional descriptive design was employed to survey technology usage and potential learning needs of AFH operators in Washington State.  The study was approved by the Institutional Review Board at the researcher’s affiliated University.  Using the Delphi technique, a survey was designed to assess technology usage and pain assessment learning needs of AFH caregivers.  The survey was mailed with a letter of introduction to all AFHs listed by the Washington State Department of Social and Health Services (n=2848).  Completed anonymous surveys were returned via self addressed postage paid envelopes to the researcher (response rate =12.1%). Results: Preliminary findings indicate diverse profiles of technology usage in AFHs.  Most homes have plain old telephone land lines (POTS) (98%) and cellular phones (96%).  Less than half of the respondents (40%) have used telehealth and approximately one-third (30%) have used real-time audio-video voice over internet protocol (VoIP).  In addition to communication technologies, preliminary findings indicate over one-third of respondent AFH (39%) use health monitoring devices as part of resident care. Conclusions/Implications: The results of this study inform the development of community-driven curriculum for care of diverse community dwelling vulnerable older adults in settings such as adult family homes.  This study also informs development of service learning strategies and care delivery programs that use telehealth in the AFH setting.en_GB
dc.subjectAdult familiesen_GB
dc.subjectHealth careen_GB
dc.subjectTechnology useen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T11:57:23Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T11:57:23Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T11:57:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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