2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211477
Type:
Research Study
Title:
MEASURING TRIBAL PERCEPTIONS OF PARTNERSHIP SUCCESS
Abstract:
Purpose/Aims: Successful community-based participatory research is dependent on a vibrant shared partnership that balances insights from the community and skills of the academic partner. The aims of this study were to: (a) measure partnership synergy and (b) discover new ideas for improving the partnership. Rationale/Background: The Environmental Health Advisory Committee (EHAC) was established to increase the understanding of and participation in research by members of a tribal community regarding environmental health risks including methylmercury exposure to infants and children on the Flathead reservation. A community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach was proposed to involve community members as advisors on all aspects of environmental health research from proposal to publication. CBPR acknowledges local expertise as essential to improve understanding of health disparities and culturally attuned interventions. Common CBPR themes include trust, participation, co-learning, shared power, and consistent, ongoing communication throughout all phases of the research. Methods: The Lasker, Weiss, and Miller (2002) Partnership Self-Assessment Tool was offered to eight members of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes Environmental Health Advisory Committee (EHAC) and two of their community partners from Salish Kootenai College and Montana State University College of Nursing in December 2009. The paper/pencil survey version of the survey was applied and results were analyzed using the offline tool coordinator guide. The tool not only assesses the partnership’s progress toward achieving synergy (5=extremely well, 1=not well at all) but also provides insight on the components of synergy that can be strengthened among divergent partners. Results: The required 65% response rate was achieved (70% of partners responded, n=7) with results indicating progress for the one-year-old partnership. Constructive guidance for 10 key components of successful collaborative processes included: partnership synergy (4.25/5); leadership (4.41/5); efficiency (4.59/5); administration and management (4.00/5); sufficiency of resources (4.17/5); decision-making (71% satisfied); benefits and drawbacks (48%); and overall satisfaction with the partnership (71% satisfied). In the spirit of CBPR, the EHAC members and academic partners examined and analyzed the survey results together in order to determine steps for future improvements. Implications: Trust and respect are easily squandered when researchers work in tribal communities. Equality and communication among partners with different goals and interests is central to successfully addressing environmental health disparities. Conducting environmental health research to protect the fetus, infant, and child from toxins is an important pursuit that is a collaborative process best achieved through engaged community and academic partners.
Keywords:
Community based participatory research
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5249
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleMEASURING TRIBAL PERCEPTIONS OF PARTNERSHIP SUCCESSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211477-
dc.description.abstractPurpose/Aims: Successful community-based participatory research is dependent on a vibrant shared partnership that balances insights from the community and skills of the academic partner. The aims of this study were to: (a) measure partnership synergy and (b) discover new ideas for improving the partnership. Rationale/Background: The Environmental Health Advisory Committee (EHAC) was established to increase the understanding of and participation in research by members of a tribal community regarding environmental health risks including methylmercury exposure to infants and children on the Flathead reservation. A community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach was proposed to involve community members as advisors on all aspects of environmental health research from proposal to publication. CBPR acknowledges local expertise as essential to improve understanding of health disparities and culturally attuned interventions. Common CBPR themes include trust, participation, co-learning, shared power, and consistent, ongoing communication throughout all phases of the research. Methods: The Lasker, Weiss, and Miller (2002) Partnership Self-Assessment Tool was offered to eight members of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes Environmental Health Advisory Committee (EHAC) and two of their community partners from Salish Kootenai College and Montana State University College of Nursing in December 2009. The paper/pencil survey version of the survey was applied and results were analyzed using the offline tool coordinator guide. The tool not only assesses the partnership’s progress toward achieving synergy (5=extremely well, 1=not well at all) but also provides insight on the components of synergy that can be strengthened among divergent partners. Results: The required 65% response rate was achieved (70% of partners responded, n=7) with results indicating progress for the one-year-old partnership. Constructive guidance for 10 key components of successful collaborative processes included: partnership synergy (4.25/5); leadership (4.41/5); efficiency (4.59/5); administration and management (4.00/5); sufficiency of resources (4.17/5); decision-making (71% satisfied); benefits and drawbacks (48%); and overall satisfaction with the partnership (71% satisfied). In the spirit of CBPR, the EHAC members and academic partners examined and analyzed the survey results together in order to determine steps for future improvements. Implications: Trust and respect are easily squandered when researchers work in tribal communities. Equality and communication among partners with different goals and interests is central to successfully addressing environmental health disparities. Conducting environmental health research to protect the fetus, infant, and child from toxins is an important pursuit that is a collaborative process best achieved through engaged community and academic partners.en_GB
dc.subjectCommunity based participatory researchen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T11:57:26Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T11:57:26Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T11:57:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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