TELENOVELAS INCREASE MEXICAN AMERICAN ELDERS' KNOWLEDGE AND CONFIDENCE IN HOME CARE

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211480
Type:
Research Study
Title:
TELENOVELAS INCREASE MEXICAN AMERICAN ELDERS' KNOWLEDGE AND CONFIDENCE IN HOME CARE
Abstract:
Purpose: To test the effect of the telenovela intervention, developed and tested in partnership with the community, on Service Awareness and Confidence in HHCS. Rationale/Background: Hispanic individuals use home health care services (HHCS) less than other groups, comprising 16.3% of the general population (U.S. Census, 2011), but only 7.7% of HHCS clients (CDC, 2007). Mexican American (MA) individuals, the largest percentage of the Hispanic population, are a group in great need of HHCS. MA elders are more functionally impaired at younger ages than others and are an under-studied group. The disparity of under-using HHCS is critical because of financial and human cost. Post-hospital care costs billions of federal dollars annually, but can be significantly reduced by using HHCS, which cost only half of nursing home care costs. Use of HHCS decreases elder functional impairment and health care services utilization (re-hospitalizations, emergency visits, and nursing home placement). HHCS reduce the indirect costs of caregiver illness, burden, depression, and mortality. Based on a community-based partnership research (CBPR) model, a local community advisory council has contributed to research questions, measures, and interventions during 10 years of preliminary studies as a basis for the study reported here. Methods: A telenovela was developed based on a prototype that had been designed and videotaped with community partners. A 12-minute version was professionally produced by a local Latino-owned company selected by the community advisory council members. A 50-minute guided dialogue, designed to promote elders’, caregivers’, and family members’ discussion about the content of the telenovela within their personal and cultural expectations of familism, was part of the intervention. A randomized two-group pretest-posttest design was used. Results: 68 MA elder-caregiver dyads participated in the study. There were no significant interaction effects for either the Elders or the Caregivers. There were significant increases in Confidence in HHCS and in the Trust and Confidence subscale across time. There were significant increases in Knowledge of HHCS, Knowledge of the Existence of HHCS subscale, and Knowledge of Access to HHCS subscale across time. There were significant group main effects for Confidence in HHCS and in the Trust and Confidence subscale: the experimental group had consistently higher scores than the control group. Implications: The findings provided evidence that viewing and discussing a CBPR-developed telenovela about HHCS can increase elders’ awareness of HHCS and confidence in using HHCS. Several elder and caregiver research participants and hospital nurses have since joined the community advisory council to further collaborate on improving the content and presentation of the telenovela. This can lead to future CBPR-based interdisciplinary translational/adoption research that will reduce health disparities within vulnerable populations by increasing their use of HHCS.
Keywords:
Home health care services; Telenovela intervention; Mexican Americans
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5255
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleTELENOVELAS INCREASE MEXICAN AMERICAN ELDERS' KNOWLEDGE AND CONFIDENCE IN HOME CAREen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211480-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To test the effect of the telenovela intervention, developed and tested in partnership with the community, on Service Awareness and Confidence in HHCS. Rationale/Background: Hispanic individuals use home health care services (HHCS) less than other groups, comprising 16.3% of the general population (U.S. Census, 2011), but only 7.7% of HHCS clients (CDC, 2007). Mexican American (MA) individuals, the largest percentage of the Hispanic population, are a group in great need of HHCS. MA elders are more functionally impaired at younger ages than others and are an under-studied group. The disparity of under-using HHCS is critical because of financial and human cost. Post-hospital care costs billions of federal dollars annually, but can be significantly reduced by using HHCS, which cost only half of nursing home care costs. Use of HHCS decreases elder functional impairment and health care services utilization (re-hospitalizations, emergency visits, and nursing home placement). HHCS reduce the indirect costs of caregiver illness, burden, depression, and mortality. Based on a community-based partnership research (CBPR) model, a local community advisory council has contributed to research questions, measures, and interventions during 10 years of preliminary studies as a basis for the study reported here. Methods: A telenovela was developed based on a prototype that had been designed and videotaped with community partners. A 12-minute version was professionally produced by a local Latino-owned company selected by the community advisory council members. A 50-minute guided dialogue, designed to promote elders’, caregivers’, and family members’ discussion about the content of the telenovela within their personal and cultural expectations of familism, was part of the intervention. A randomized two-group pretest-posttest design was used. Results: 68 MA elder-caregiver dyads participated in the study. There were no significant interaction effects for either the Elders or the Caregivers. There were significant increases in Confidence in HHCS and in the Trust and Confidence subscale across time. There were significant increases in Knowledge of HHCS, Knowledge of the Existence of HHCS subscale, and Knowledge of Access to HHCS subscale across time. There were significant group main effects for Confidence in HHCS and in the Trust and Confidence subscale: the experimental group had consistently higher scores than the control group. Implications: The findings provided evidence that viewing and discussing a CBPR-developed telenovela about HHCS can increase elders’ awareness of HHCS and confidence in using HHCS. Several elder and caregiver research participants and hospital nurses have since joined the community advisory council to further collaborate on improving the content and presentation of the telenovela. This can lead to future CBPR-based interdisciplinary translational/adoption research that will reduce health disparities within vulnerable populations by increasing their use of HHCS.en_GB
dc.subjectHome health care servicesen_GB
dc.subjectTelenovela interventionen_GB
dc.subjectMexican Americansen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T11:57:37Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T11:57:37Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T11:57:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.