BUILDING COMMUNITY-ACADEMIC PARTNERSHIP-THE JACKSON COUNTY LATINA HEALTH COALITION

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211481
Type:
Research Study
Title:
BUILDING COMMUNITY-ACADEMIC PARTNERSHIP-THE JACKSON COUNTY LATINA HEALTH COALITION
Abstract:
Purpose/Aims.  The purpose of this study was, through a community-based participatory research approach, to build a community and academic partnership in rural Jackson County, Oregon to promote improved reproductive health for Latinas and healthier birth outcomes for Latino infants in our community. Year one aims were to 1) Develop and strengthen existing academic and community partnerships committed to promoting improved reproductive health for Latinas in our community; 2) Conduct a secondary analysis of existing data from previous community assessments to inform current partners regarding factors that impact reproductive health for Latinas; and, 3) Build commitment and capacity for community and academic partners in research methodology. Rationale/Background.  Latinas in the United States have less healthy birth outcomes than their non-Latina counterparts, and second-generation Latinas have less healthy babies and birth outcomes than their first generation Latina mothers, who delivered their babies in Mexico. Children born prematurely are more likely to have chronic neuromuscular and respiratory diseases than term births. In 2005, Latinas were twice as likely as non-Latina white women to be diagnosed with cervical cancer (Office of Minority Health, 2009). Latina teens get pregnant twice as often as the national average, and the Sexually Transmitted Infection rate is higher among Latinos. Of the 311 teen pregnancies in Jackson County during 2004-2006, 85 or 27% occurred in Latina adolescent women. This greatly exceeds census data that report 11.7% of people under age 18 in Jackson County to be Hispanic. Methods. Recommended CBPR strategies were used to build the partnership including goal assessment and development of mission, values and operating norms of the coalition.  Recent community assessments as well as the most current county data on pregnancy and birth rates were reviewed as a foundational step in our research process.  A consultant with expertise in CBPR was utilized to provide training on CBPR methods and developing community-academic partnerships in rural communities. Results. The Jackson County Latina Health Coalition was formed in 2009 and currently consists of seven partners from academic, clinical and service agencies that all provide support and services to Latina families. During year one, the coalition developed mission and vision statements;  agreed on principles of collaboration, and decision-making process; developed roles of each partner; participated in CBPR training with outside consultant; and received responsible conduct of research training. Review of current community assessments resulted in the identification of key communities within Jackson County to target.  The coalition identified key issues for system change and key questions that needed further research. An additional community assessment was then undertaken to determine the community readiness to address the problem of unintended teen pregnancy rates among Latina teens in Jackson County.  Additional future funding was received for one coalition partner to implement a culturally-based intervention to reduce sexual risk and another for the coalition to continue community assessments and plan interventions. Implications. Identification of key organizations and committed individuals within those organizations was crucial to the successful establishment of the coalition.  Rural communities may pose specific considerations when building successful CBPR partnerships.
Keywords:
Latinas; Latino infants; Birth outcomes; Community based participatory research
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5256
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleBUILDING COMMUNITY-ACADEMIC PARTNERSHIP-THE JACKSON COUNTY LATINA HEALTH COALITIONen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211481-
dc.description.abstractPurpose/Aims.  The purpose of this study was, through a community-based participatory research approach, to build a community and academic partnership in rural Jackson County, Oregon to promote improved reproductive health for Latinas and healthier birth outcomes for Latino infants in our community. Year one aims were to 1) Develop and strengthen existing academic and community partnerships committed to promoting improved reproductive health for Latinas in our community; 2) Conduct a secondary analysis of existing data from previous community assessments to inform current partners regarding factors that impact reproductive health for Latinas; and, 3) Build commitment and capacity for community and academic partners in research methodology. Rationale/Background.  Latinas in the United States have less healthy birth outcomes than their non-Latina counterparts, and second-generation Latinas have less healthy babies and birth outcomes than their first generation Latina mothers, who delivered their babies in Mexico. Children born prematurely are more likely to have chronic neuromuscular and respiratory diseases than term births. In 2005, Latinas were twice as likely as non-Latina white women to be diagnosed with cervical cancer (Office of Minority Health, 2009). Latina teens get pregnant twice as often as the national average, and the Sexually Transmitted Infection rate is higher among Latinos. Of the 311 teen pregnancies in Jackson County during 2004-2006, 85 or 27% occurred in Latina adolescent women. This greatly exceeds census data that report 11.7% of people under age 18 in Jackson County to be Hispanic. Methods. Recommended CBPR strategies were used to build the partnership including goal assessment and development of mission, values and operating norms of the coalition.  Recent community assessments as well as the most current county data on pregnancy and birth rates were reviewed as a foundational step in our research process.  A consultant with expertise in CBPR was utilized to provide training on CBPR methods and developing community-academic partnerships in rural communities. Results. The Jackson County Latina Health Coalition was formed in 2009 and currently consists of seven partners from academic, clinical and service agencies that all provide support and services to Latina families. During year one, the coalition developed mission and vision statements;  agreed on principles of collaboration, and decision-making process; developed roles of each partner; participated in CBPR training with outside consultant; and received responsible conduct of research training. Review of current community assessments resulted in the identification of key communities within Jackson County to target.  The coalition identified key issues for system change and key questions that needed further research. An additional community assessment was then undertaken to determine the community readiness to address the problem of unintended teen pregnancy rates among Latina teens in Jackson County.  Additional future funding was received for one coalition partner to implement a culturally-based intervention to reduce sexual risk and another for the coalition to continue community assessments and plan interventions. Implications. Identification of key organizations and committed individuals within those organizations was crucial to the successful establishment of the coalition.  Rural communities may pose specific considerations when building successful CBPR partnerships.en_GB
dc.subjectLatinasen_GB
dc.subjectLatino infantsen_GB
dc.subjectBirth outcomesen_GB
dc.subjectCommunity based participatory researchen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T11:57:40Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T11:57:40Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T11:57:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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