2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211482
Type:
Research Study
Title:
MEXICAN YOUTH AND WOMEN RELATE EMPOWERING EFFECTS OF THEIR AFFILIATION
Abstract:
Purpose/Aims: Community Based Participatory Research (CBPR) principles were applied to the process of engaging graduate nursing students with the women’s group, Las Mujeres Nobles de Harlandale over several semesters. By critically examining the role of power within the group’s interactions, students were able to offer material, informational, and emotional support while learning about the women and their active role in reducing violence in the community. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: Women’s groups regularly provide opportunities for the development of personal competence and a positive self-concept. Personal and group goals for social action, developed within the context of a socially supportive environment, improve the likelihood of individual and group success. Strengthening individual talents informs the group’s sense of their collective capacity for improving life’s circumstances and health. In this study, Mexican youth and women, using cooperative decision making as an operational tenet, participated in developing a community intervention for violence prevention in partnership with faculty and graduate students. The women’s unique approach to social change was presenting skits depicting multiple forms of interpersonal violence during National Night Out. Their success was evident in comments from community members many of whom did not know about dating violence and elder abuse. Methods: A series of individual and focus group interviews were conducted by faculty and students with youth and women members of the group to understand how their membership and activities in the group contributed to their personal growth and empowerment. Transcripts of audiotapes were analyzed using content analysis and analytical induction. Results: A staged process of becoming empowered was identified from transcript analysis. While women did not report specific life changes outside the sphere of the women’s group, the youth did state specific life goals related to education, career, and personhood. Implications: Using CBPR principles to guide graduate nursing student trust building interactions within community groups is a viable teaching/learning strategy. In this study, interviews yielded information about the process of feeling empowered. Women’s particular assets were identified in the group and strengthened through the work that they did. 
Keywords:
Community based participatory research; Graduate nursing students; Las Mujeres Nobles de Harlandale
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5261
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleMEXICAN YOUTH AND WOMEN RELATE EMPOWERING EFFECTS OF THEIR AFFILIATIONen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211482-
dc.description.abstractPurpose/Aims: Community Based Participatory Research (CBPR) principles were applied to the process of engaging graduate nursing students with the women’s group, Las Mujeres Nobles de Harlandale over several semesters. By critically examining the role of power within the group’s interactions, students were able to offer material, informational, and emotional support while learning about the women and their active role in reducing violence in the community. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: Women’s groups regularly provide opportunities for the development of personal competence and a positive self-concept. Personal and group goals for social action, developed within the context of a socially supportive environment, improve the likelihood of individual and group success. Strengthening individual talents informs the group’s sense of their collective capacity for improving life’s circumstances and health. In this study, Mexican youth and women, using cooperative decision making as an operational tenet, participated in developing a community intervention for violence prevention in partnership with faculty and graduate students. The women’s unique approach to social change was presenting skits depicting multiple forms of interpersonal violence during National Night Out. Their success was evident in comments from community members many of whom did not know about dating violence and elder abuse. Methods: A series of individual and focus group interviews were conducted by faculty and students with youth and women members of the group to understand how their membership and activities in the group contributed to their personal growth and empowerment. Transcripts of audiotapes were analyzed using content analysis and analytical induction. Results: A staged process of becoming empowered was identified from transcript analysis. While women did not report specific life changes outside the sphere of the women’s group, the youth did state specific life goals related to education, career, and personhood. Implications: Using CBPR principles to guide graduate nursing student trust building interactions within community groups is a viable teaching/learning strategy. In this study, interviews yielded information about the process of feeling empowered. Women’s particular assets were identified in the group and strengthened through the work that they did. en_GB
dc.subjectCommunity based participatory researchen_GB
dc.subjectGraduate nursing studentsen_GB
dc.subjectLas Mujeres Nobles de Harlandaleen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T11:57:44Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T11:57:44Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T11:57:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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