PERCEPTION OF FAMILY PRESENCE DURING RESUSCITATION: PSYCHOMETRIC ANALYSIS OF SCALES

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211484
Type:
Research Study
Title:
PERCEPTION OF FAMILY PRESENCE DURING RESUSCITATION: PSYCHOMETRIC ANALYSIS OF SCALES
Abstract:
Purpose/Aims: This study explored the factor structure and the test-retest reliability of two scales used to measure the perceptions of risk/benefit and the perceptions of self-confidence in role performance related to family presence during resuscitation. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: The majority of data related to family presence has been collected using researcher-developed, single-study surveys in small samples. A valid and reliable way to measure perceptions of family presence in large samples is needed. Twibell et al. (2008) developed and tested two scales designed to measure nurses’ perceptions related to family presence, the Family Presence Risk-Benefit Scale (FPR-BS), and the Family Presence Self-Confidence Scale (FPS-CS). Initial reliability and validity of the scales were supported in the original study conducted with a large sample of nurses. However, further development and testing is needed. This study is a psychometric analysis of the FPR-BS and FPS-CS scales using data collected from 256 baccalaureate nursing students. The students were part of a multi-site study that tested the effectiveness of an educational intervention related to family presence. Methods: Data in this study were collected pre and post educational intervention using the FPR-BS and the FPS-CS. Exploratory factor analysis using maximum likelihood estimation was performed to determine construct validity. Item-to-total correlations and Cronbach’s a were used to determine reliability. Test-retest reliability for both scales was performed by examining the correlation between pre and post-test scores. Significance for all tests was set at P < 0.05. Results: A single factor solution resulted for the 22 item FPR-BS. This single factor accounted for 37.5% of the variability in students’ perception of the risks/benefits of family presence, with factor loadings from 0.323 to 0.802. Cronbach’s a reliability score was 0.90. A single factor explained 39.5% of the variance in the students’ perception of self-confidence scores according to the 17 item FPS-CS, with factor loadings from 0.450 to 0.694. Cronbach’s a reliability score was 0.90. Test-retest reliability scores were a = 0.756 for the FPR-BS, and a = 0.860 for the FPS-CS. Implications: These results support those found in the Twibell (2008) study, and add to the evidence of the validity and reliability of the scales when used in a different population. Additionally, test-retest reliability suggests that the scales are sensitive to student-reported changes in perception of family presence following the intervention.
Keywords:
Family presence; Resuscitation; Nurses' perceptions
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5266
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titlePERCEPTION OF FAMILY PRESENCE DURING RESUSCITATION: PSYCHOMETRIC ANALYSIS OF SCALESen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211484-
dc.description.abstractPurpose/Aims: This study explored the factor structure and the test-retest reliability of two scales used to measure the perceptions of risk/benefit and the perceptions of self-confidence in role performance related to family presence during resuscitation. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: The majority of data related to family presence has been collected using researcher-developed, single-study surveys in small samples. A valid and reliable way to measure perceptions of family presence in large samples is needed. Twibell et al. (2008) developed and tested two scales designed to measure nurses’ perceptions related to family presence, the Family Presence Risk-Benefit Scale (FPR-BS), and the Family Presence Self-Confidence Scale (FPS-CS). Initial reliability and validity of the scales were supported in the original study conducted with a large sample of nurses. However, further development and testing is needed. This study is a psychometric analysis of the FPR-BS and FPS-CS scales using data collected from 256 baccalaureate nursing students. The students were part of a multi-site study that tested the effectiveness of an educational intervention related to family presence. Methods: Data in this study were collected pre and post educational intervention using the FPR-BS and the FPS-CS. Exploratory factor analysis using maximum likelihood estimation was performed to determine construct validity. Item-to-total correlations and Cronbach’s a were used to determine reliability. Test-retest reliability for both scales was performed by examining the correlation between pre and post-test scores. Significance for all tests was set at P < 0.05. Results: A single factor solution resulted for the 22 item FPR-BS. This single factor accounted for 37.5% of the variability in students’ perception of the risks/benefits of family presence, with factor loadings from 0.323 to 0.802. Cronbach’s a reliability score was 0.90. A single factor explained 39.5% of the variance in the students’ perception of self-confidence scores according to the 17 item FPS-CS, with factor loadings from 0.450 to 0.694. Cronbach’s a reliability score was 0.90. Test-retest reliability scores were a = 0.756 for the FPR-BS, and a = 0.860 for the FPS-CS. Implications: These results support those found in the Twibell (2008) study, and add to the evidence of the validity and reliability of the scales when used in a different population. Additionally, test-retest reliability suggests that the scales are sensitive to student-reported changes in perception of family presence following the intervention.en_GB
dc.subjectFamily presenceen_GB
dc.subjectResuscitationen_GB
dc.subjectNurses' perceptionsen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T11:57:51Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T11:57:51Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T11:57:51Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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