2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211488
Type:
Research Study
Title:
FISCAL CRISIS CUTS: IDENTIFICATION OF SENSITIVE MATERNAL/CHILD HEALTH OUTCOMES
Abstract:
Purposes/Aims:  The aims of this in-progress research project are to:  1) Identify and define key concepts, variables, and hypothesized linkages to form the basis of a conceptual model of relationships between/among changes in public health funding levels for maternal/child health (MCH) programs and related proximal health outcomes; 2) Identify, evaluate, obtain and link secondary data sources suitable for use in testing the posited model; 3) Quantify degree and direction of predictive relationships between variables in the hypothesized model through analysis of linked data using analytical modeling techniques; 4) Disseminate findings of analyses through academic papers and abstracts and policy briefs to key stakeholders. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: The State of Washington’s declining government revenues have forced policy makers into difficult programmatic decisions.  Local health department (LHD) budgets have been particularly hard hit, with some of the most sudden and severe program cuts made to MCH services provided by the State’s 35 LHDs.  Under the best of circumstances, little is known about outcomes of MCH services delivered by LHDs and whether governmental investments in clinical preventive services improve health outcomes.  Using fiscal crisis-driven LHD and MCH (LHD/MCH) budget and service cuts as a natural experiment, this translational clinical research project is exploring whether predictive relationships exist between recent cuts in LHD/MCH budgets and services and proximal MCH outcomes.  Based on the broad hypothesis that decreases in public health funding to LHD/MCH budgets and services are having, and have had, negative direct and indirect effects on proximal MCH outcomes; key informant interviews and secondary data analysis methods are being employed to identify and explore pre-, intra-and post-fiscal crisis relationships between variables. Methods: Key informant interviews and secondary data analysis methods are being employed to identify and explore pre-, intra-and post-fiscal crisis relationships between variables. Data and input are being sought from branches of local, state, and federal government and are being integrated into a dataset sufficient for multi-level statistical modeling. Results:  Results will be presented in poster form at the 2011 WIN Conference. Implications: Study results will identify significant predictive relationships between variables, laying the groundwork for continued research into this timely, emerging area of translational clinical research and practice.
Keywords:
Maternal child health; Public Health Funding
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5292
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleFISCAL CRISIS CUTS: IDENTIFICATION OF SENSITIVE MATERNAL/CHILD HEALTH OUTCOMESen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211488-
dc.description.abstractPurposes/Aims:  The aims of this in-progress research project are to:  1) Identify and define key concepts, variables, and hypothesized linkages to form the basis of a conceptual model of relationships between/among changes in public health funding levels for maternal/child health (MCH) programs and related proximal health outcomes; 2) Identify, evaluate, obtain and link secondary data sources suitable for use in testing the posited model; 3) Quantify degree and direction of predictive relationships between variables in the hypothesized model through analysis of linked data using analytical modeling techniques; 4) Disseminate findings of analyses through academic papers and abstracts and policy briefs to key stakeholders. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: The State of Washington’s declining government revenues have forced policy makers into difficult programmatic decisions.  Local health department (LHD) budgets have been particularly hard hit, with some of the most sudden and severe program cuts made to MCH services provided by the State’s 35 LHDs.  Under the best of circumstances, little is known about outcomes of MCH services delivered by LHDs and whether governmental investments in clinical preventive services improve health outcomes.  Using fiscal crisis-driven LHD and MCH (LHD/MCH) budget and service cuts as a natural experiment, this translational clinical research project is exploring whether predictive relationships exist between recent cuts in LHD/MCH budgets and services and proximal MCH outcomes.  Based on the broad hypothesis that decreases in public health funding to LHD/MCH budgets and services are having, and have had, negative direct and indirect effects on proximal MCH outcomes; key informant interviews and secondary data analysis methods are being employed to identify and explore pre-, intra-and post-fiscal crisis relationships between variables. Methods: Key informant interviews and secondary data analysis methods are being employed to identify and explore pre-, intra-and post-fiscal crisis relationships between variables. Data and input are being sought from branches of local, state, and federal government and are being integrated into a dataset sufficient for multi-level statistical modeling. Results:  Results will be presented in poster form at the 2011 WIN Conference. Implications: Study results will identify significant predictive relationships between variables, laying the groundwork for continued research into this timely, emerging area of translational clinical research and practice.en_GB
dc.subjectMaternal child healthen_GB
dc.subjectPublic Health Fundingen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T11:58:05Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T11:58:05Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T11:58:05Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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