PERSONAL CHARACTERISTICS PREDICTIVE OF DEPRESSION in HISPANICS WITH HEART FAILURE

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211489
Type:
Research Study
Title:
PERSONAL CHARACTERISTICS PREDICTIVE OF DEPRESSION in HISPANICS WITH HEART FAILURE
Abstract:
Purpose: The purposes of this study were to assess the prevalence of depressive symptoms in Hispanics with HF and to examine the personal characteristics predicting depressive symptoms at baseline and at 6-months follow-up. Background: Heart failure (HF) is a significant public health problem that is increasing in the Hispanic minority population. Depression, a highly prevalent symptom among people with HF, aggravates clinical symptoms of HF and increases mortality. Although personal characteristics can help identify patients in the general population at risk for developing depression, studies identifying the characteristics of Hispanics who are most at risk for depression are lacking. Methods: In this secondary data analysis of data from a randomized controlled trial, 87 subjects, who completed a study of telephone case management were studied. Patient characteristics hypothesized to influence depressive symptoms included age, gender, education, living situation, comorbid conditions (Charlson Comorbidity Index), social support, New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional classification and acculturation (Short Acculturation Scale for Hispanics). Depressive symptoms were measured with the Patient Health Questionnaire-9. Regression analysis was used to identify predictors of depressive symptoms 6-months after hospital discharge. Results: The typical participant was female (54%), living with someone (87.4%), with class III/IV heart failure (87.4%), and less than a high school education (79.3%). The mean age was 73 years (SD: 9.2, range: 53-94). Depression based on a cut-point ≥ 10 was present in 39.1% (n=35) of the participants at baseline and 1.1% (n=1) at 6-months. The mean depressive symptom scores were 8.57 (SD: 5.42, range: 0-22) at baseline and 1.86 (SD: 2.41, range: 0-14) at 6-month. Factors associated with depressive symptoms at baseline were gender and NYHA class. At 6-months follow-up, level of acculturation and co-morbidity were significantly related to the presence of depressive symptoms. Implications: Depressive symptoms were highly prevalent in Hispanics with HF. Easily identifiable personal characteristics can be useful to health care providers caring for these patients and may provide direction for interventions to reduce depression associated with HF.
Keywords:
Hispanic minority population; Heart failure
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5294
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titlePERSONAL CHARACTERISTICS PREDICTIVE OF DEPRESSION in HISPANICS WITH HEART FAILUREen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211489-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purposes of this study were to assess the prevalence of depressive symptoms in Hispanics with HF and to examine the personal characteristics predicting depressive symptoms at baseline and at 6-months follow-up. Background: Heart failure (HF) is a significant public health problem that is increasing in the Hispanic minority population. Depression, a highly prevalent symptom among people with HF, aggravates clinical symptoms of HF and increases mortality. Although personal characteristics can help identify patients in the general population at risk for developing depression, studies identifying the characteristics of Hispanics who are most at risk for depression are lacking. Methods: In this secondary data analysis of data from a randomized controlled trial, 87 subjects, who completed a study of telephone case management were studied. Patient characteristics hypothesized to influence depressive symptoms included age, gender, education, living situation, comorbid conditions (Charlson Comorbidity Index), social support, New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional classification and acculturation (Short Acculturation Scale for Hispanics). Depressive symptoms were measured with the Patient Health Questionnaire-9. Regression analysis was used to identify predictors of depressive symptoms 6-months after hospital discharge. Results: The typical participant was female (54%), living with someone (87.4%), with class III/IV heart failure (87.4%), and less than a high school education (79.3%). The mean age was 73 years (SD: 9.2, range: 53-94). Depression based on a cut-point ≥ 10 was present in 39.1% (n=35) of the participants at baseline and 1.1% (n=1) at 6-months. The mean depressive symptom scores were 8.57 (SD: 5.42, range: 0-22) at baseline and 1.86 (SD: 2.41, range: 0-14) at 6-month. Factors associated with depressive symptoms at baseline were gender and NYHA class. At 6-months follow-up, level of acculturation and co-morbidity were significantly related to the presence of depressive symptoms. Implications: Depressive symptoms were highly prevalent in Hispanics with HF. Easily identifiable personal characteristics can be useful to health care providers caring for these patients and may provide direction for interventions to reduce depression associated with HF.en_GB
dc.subjectHispanic minority populationen_GB
dc.subjectHeart failureen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T11:58:09Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T11:58:09Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T11:58:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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