2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211490
Type:
Research Study
Title:
NURSE ADDICTION: AN EXAMINATION OF STRESS, COPING AND ADAPTATION
Abstract:
Purpose/Aims: The purpose of this research was to examine the relationships among stress, social support, and well-being in nurses in a recovery and monitoring program in the state of New Jersey.  Additionally, it sought to examine the mediating effect of social support on the relationship between stress and well-being in this population. Rationale/ Conceptual Basis/ Background: Addiction is nursing has been documented since the nineteenth century. Addiction rates in nurses are reportedly higher than the general population. Exposures to high levels of stress, ineffective coping and inadequate social support may be responsible for the increased incidence in this population. Evaluation of supportive measures, feeling of overall well-being and perception of stress may provide insight for improved treatment methods and sustained recovery. Undertaking/ Best Practice/Methods: The rights of individuals were protected and informed consent was obtained. Nurse participants (N= 82) received a 16 item demographic sheet and three established surveys: the Perceived Stress Scale, Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support and the Psychological General Well-Being Index.  The Cronbach α for the instruments used in this study were .87, .93, and .93 respectively. Bi-variate and regression analyses were performed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS). Two-tailed tests were used to determine the level of significance at the .05 level. Outcomes Achieved/ Documented: A positive relationship was found between social support and well-being.  Negative relationships were found between stress and social support and stress and well-being (all p values < .05).  The direct relationship between stress and well-being was decreased in the presence of social support.  The mediator, social support, did not have a significant effect on general well-being (p = .22). Nurses in this study did report a decrease in levels of perceived stress when social support was increased. The significant inverse relationship identified in this research between levels of perceived stress and its effect on well-being must be emphasized (r = -.72, p = .00).  Furthermore, the decrease in the relationship between stress and well-being when social support was added (β=-.67, p = .00) highlights the importance of social support in the presence of stress. Conclusion: The findings suggest that an increased awareness of stress and its damaging effects on overall well-being must be identified so proactive and supportive measures can be implemented.  The development of effective coping strategies may enhance feelings of well-being and augment the perception of stress. Methods to strengthen social support and social networks may enhance sustained recovery, aide in relapse prevention and provide safe re-entry into nursing practice.  Additionally, broader forms of social support must be explored to determine their effectiveness for the nurse in recovery.
Keywords:
Addictions nursing; Nurse stress
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5297
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleNURSE ADDICTION: AN EXAMINATION OF STRESS, COPING AND ADAPTATIONen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211490-
dc.description.abstractPurpose/Aims: The purpose of this research was to examine the relationships among stress, social support, and well-being in nurses in a recovery and monitoring program in the state of New Jersey.  Additionally, it sought to examine the mediating effect of social support on the relationship between stress and well-being in this population. Rationale/ Conceptual Basis/ Background: Addiction is nursing has been documented since the nineteenth century. Addiction rates in nurses are reportedly higher than the general population. Exposures to high levels of stress, ineffective coping and inadequate social support may be responsible for the increased incidence in this population. Evaluation of supportive measures, feeling of overall well-being and perception of stress may provide insight for improved treatment methods and sustained recovery. Undertaking/ Best Practice/Methods: The rights of individuals were protected and informed consent was obtained. Nurse participants (N= 82) received a 16 item demographic sheet and three established surveys: the Perceived Stress Scale, Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support and the Psychological General Well-Being Index.  The Cronbach α for the instruments used in this study were .87, .93, and .93 respectively. Bi-variate and regression analyses were performed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS). Two-tailed tests were used to determine the level of significance at the .05 level. Outcomes Achieved/ Documented: A positive relationship was found between social support and well-being.  Negative relationships were found between stress and social support and stress and well-being (all p values < .05).  The direct relationship between stress and well-being was decreased in the presence of social support.  The mediator, social support, did not have a significant effect on general well-being (p = .22). Nurses in this study did report a decrease in levels of perceived stress when social support was increased. The significant inverse relationship identified in this research between levels of perceived stress and its effect on well-being must be emphasized (r = -.72, p = .00).  Furthermore, the decrease in the relationship between stress and well-being when social support was added (β=-.67, p = .00) highlights the importance of social support in the presence of stress. Conclusion: The findings suggest that an increased awareness of stress and its damaging effects on overall well-being must be identified so proactive and supportive measures can be implemented.  The development of effective coping strategies may enhance feelings of well-being and augment the perception of stress. Methods to strengthen social support and social networks may enhance sustained recovery, aide in relapse prevention and provide safe re-entry into nursing practice.  Additionally, broader forms of social support must be explored to determine their effectiveness for the nurse in recovery.en_GB
dc.subjectAddictions nursingen_GB
dc.subjectNurse stressen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T11:58:12Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T11:58:12Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T11:58:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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