2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211491
Type:
Research Study
Title:
ENGAGING MEXICAN AMERICAN ADOLESCENTS TO PREVENT OBESITY & TYPE 2 DIABETES
Abstract:
Purposes/Aims: To partner with Mexican American adolescents at the TX–Mexico border to determine physical activity and nutrition patterns associated with overweight, obesity, and insulin resistance (IR). Rationale/Background: Worldwide estimates of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) are spiraling upward to 440 million by 2030, requiring more intricate management regimens than merely provider-directed glucose control. Although lower income countries expect to bear future increased disease prevalence, this disparate trend currently exists in the United States (US)–Mexico border region. Research to decrease disparity and advance prevention evidence is needed. The adolescent population provides an excellent target for prevention strategies. However, due to underrepresentation in research studies, baseline data for adolescents 15 to 19 years is lacking. This study was conducted along the Texas (TX)–Mexico border where schools serve one of the poorest US regions. Community based participatory research (CBPR) principles guided our partnership with the school community. Methods: Recruitment strategies were developed in partnership with school nurses, principals, faculty, and students. Informational seminars about T2DM and study procedures were presented to potential participants by study partners. Measures included height, weight, waist circumference, fasting glucose, fasting insulin and surveys. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were performed. Outcomes Achieved: Anthropometric and laboratory data, reported elsewhere, provide evidence that obesity and metabolic abnormalities are present without overt T2DM. Of 337 adolescents who consented to participate, 325 (65% female) completed all data collection. Most (68%) were enrolled in 9th/10th grade, average age was 16 years, and 92% self-reported Mexican descent. Waist circumferences >75th percentile indicative of central obesity occurred in 27%, body mass index > 95th percentile (obesity) occurred in 27%, and IR in 27%. Participants spent an average of 5.23 (±1.62) hours screen time/day. Participants reported drinking sweet beverages on average 1.88 (±0.85) servings/day; eating high fat foods 9.25 (±2.93) servings/day and snack foods 6.64 (±2.19) servings/day. Compared to the non–obese, obese adolescents engaged in more screen time; drank more sweet beverages; and had higher intake of high fat foods/snack foods. Compared to those without IR, adolescents with IR engaged in more screen time; drank more sweet beverages; and had higher high fat foods/snack foods intake. Conclusions: Lifestyle interventions with adolescents are needed to prevent T2DM.  Obesity is already present by age 15. Adolescents most at risk for T2DM are likely to be among those who exhibit insulin IR. Transition to glucose intolerance in T2DM occurs gradually with chronic IR. Measurement of IR may be useful to assess improvement in prevention studies. Adolescents present particular challenges for recruitment/enrollment. Employing CBPR ideology facilitated adolescent engagement in recruitment, enrollment, data collection, and analysis processes.  Research practice built upon CBPR philosophical foundations presents more meaningful research questions, strengthens data quality, and provides useful results.
Keywords:
Mexican American adolescents; Obesity; Type 2 diabetes
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5298
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleENGAGING MEXICAN AMERICAN ADOLESCENTS TO PREVENT OBESITY & TYPE 2 DIABETESen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211491-
dc.description.abstractPurposes/Aims: To partner with Mexican American adolescents at the TX–Mexico border to determine physical activity and nutrition patterns associated with overweight, obesity, and insulin resistance (IR). Rationale/Background: Worldwide estimates of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) are spiraling upward to 440 million by 2030, requiring more intricate management regimens than merely provider-directed glucose control. Although lower income countries expect to bear future increased disease prevalence, this disparate trend currently exists in the United States (US)–Mexico border region. Research to decrease disparity and advance prevention evidence is needed. The adolescent population provides an excellent target for prevention strategies. However, due to underrepresentation in research studies, baseline data for adolescents 15 to 19 years is lacking. This study was conducted along the Texas (TX)–Mexico border where schools serve one of the poorest US regions. Community based participatory research (CBPR) principles guided our partnership with the school community. Methods: Recruitment strategies were developed in partnership with school nurses, principals, faculty, and students. Informational seminars about T2DM and study procedures were presented to potential participants by study partners. Measures included height, weight, waist circumference, fasting glucose, fasting insulin and surveys. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were performed. Outcomes Achieved: Anthropometric and laboratory data, reported elsewhere, provide evidence that obesity and metabolic abnormalities are present without overt T2DM. Of 337 adolescents who consented to participate, 325 (65% female) completed all data collection. Most (68%) were enrolled in 9th/10th grade, average age was 16 years, and 92% self-reported Mexican descent. Waist circumferences >75th percentile indicative of central obesity occurred in 27%, body mass index > 95th percentile (obesity) occurred in 27%, and IR in 27%. Participants spent an average of 5.23 (±1.62) hours screen time/day. Participants reported drinking sweet beverages on average 1.88 (±0.85) servings/day; eating high fat foods 9.25 (±2.93) servings/day and snack foods 6.64 (±2.19) servings/day. Compared to the non–obese, obese adolescents engaged in more screen time; drank more sweet beverages; and had higher intake of high fat foods/snack foods. Compared to those without IR, adolescents with IR engaged in more screen time; drank more sweet beverages; and had higher high fat foods/snack foods intake. Conclusions: Lifestyle interventions with adolescents are needed to prevent T2DM.  Obesity is already present by age 15. Adolescents most at risk for T2DM are likely to be among those who exhibit insulin IR. Transition to glucose intolerance in T2DM occurs gradually with chronic IR. Measurement of IR may be useful to assess improvement in prevention studies. Adolescents present particular challenges for recruitment/enrollment. Employing CBPR ideology facilitated adolescent engagement in recruitment, enrollment, data collection, and analysis processes.  Research practice built upon CBPR philosophical foundations presents more meaningful research questions, strengthens data quality, and provides useful results.en_GB
dc.subjectMexican American adolescentsen_GB
dc.subjectObesityen_GB
dc.subjectType 2 diabetesen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T11:58:16Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T11:58:16Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T11:58:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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