INFLUENCES OF KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDES, AND BELIEFS on INTENTION TO PROMOTE BREASTFEEDING

8.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211496
Type:
Research Study
Title:
INFLUENCES OF KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDES, AND BELIEFS on INTENTION TO PROMOTE BREASTFEEDING
Abstract:
Purposes/Aims: The purpose of this study was to evaluate traditional (pre-licensure, first degree) and non-traditional (accelerated, pre-licensure, second degree) student nurses’ attitude and intention to promote breastfeeding best practices. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: Numerous research studies have shown the value of exclusive breastfeeding for infants, women, families, and society. Exclusive breastfeeding rates in the United States still do not meet Healthy People 2020 objectives, and a significant number of nurses do not appear to be aware of the importance and benefits of breastfeeding.  A wide variance in nurses’ attitudes toward promoting and encouraging breastfeeding has been observed despite intellectual agreement that breastfeeding provides the best health outcomes for infants and their mothers. Methods: Fishbein’s Theory of Reasoned Action was used to evaluate student nurses’ intention to promote breastfeeding with their patients. Prior to the study, Human Subjects approval was obtained from the university Institutional Review Board. The following surveys were administered to 84 student nurses in a public pre-licensure program: Demographic Questionnaire, Lewinsky Breastfeeding Survey Tool, and Bernaix's Nursing Support for Breastfeeding Questionnaire. A single item was added to the demographic questionnaire that asked students to rate their clinical breastfeeding experience on a scale ranging from very negative to very positive. Students were surveyed at the end of their Maternal-Child nursing course. Results: Of the study variables, perceptions of the student’s clinical experience was found to be related to attitude about breastfeeding, and attitude about breastfeeding was found to have a positive influence on future intention to promote breastfeeding. Implications: Nurse educators can use these findings to strategize teaching activities to structure students’ clinical sessions, choose Baby-Friendly clinical sites whenever possible, and utilize creative strategies to influence students’ attitudes and knowledge about breastfeeding to achieve Healthy People 2020 goals for breastfeeding rates.
Keywords:
Nurse-attitudes-evaluation; Breast Feeding
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
4590
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleINFLUENCES OF KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDES, AND BELIEFS on INTENTION TO PROMOTE BREASTFEEDINGen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211496-
dc.description.abstractPurposes/Aims: The purpose of this study was to evaluate traditional (pre-licensure, first degree) and non-traditional (accelerated, pre-licensure, second degree) student nurses’ attitude and intention to promote breastfeeding best practices. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: Numerous research studies have shown the value of exclusive breastfeeding for infants, women, families, and society. Exclusive breastfeeding rates in the United States still do not meet Healthy People 2020 objectives, and a significant number of nurses do not appear to be aware of the importance and benefits of breastfeeding.  A wide variance in nurses’ attitudes toward promoting and encouraging breastfeeding has been observed despite intellectual agreement that breastfeeding provides the best health outcomes for infants and their mothers. Methods: Fishbein’s Theory of Reasoned Action was used to evaluate student nurses’ intention to promote breastfeeding with their patients. Prior to the study, Human Subjects approval was obtained from the university Institutional Review Board. The following surveys were administered to 84 student nurses in a public pre-licensure program: Demographic Questionnaire, Lewinsky Breastfeeding Survey Tool, and Bernaix's Nursing Support for Breastfeeding Questionnaire. A single item was added to the demographic questionnaire that asked students to rate their clinical breastfeeding experience on a scale ranging from very negative to very positive. Students were surveyed at the end of their Maternal-Child nursing course. Results: Of the study variables, perceptions of the student’s clinical experience was found to be related to attitude about breastfeeding, and attitude about breastfeeding was found to have a positive influence on future intention to promote breastfeeding. Implications: Nurse educators can use these findings to strategize teaching activities to structure students’ clinical sessions, choose Baby-Friendly clinical sites whenever possible, and utilize creative strategies to influence students’ attitudes and knowledge about breastfeeding to achieve Healthy People 2020 goals for breastfeeding rates.en_GB
dc.subjectNurse-attitudes-evaluationen_GB
dc.subjectBreast Feedingen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T11:58:33Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T11:58:33Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T11:58:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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