2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211497
Type:
Research Study
Title:
RECRUITING OLDER AMERICAN INDIANS FOR DESIGNING HOSPICE INTERVENTION
Abstract:
PURPOSE: To engage the Montana American-Indian (AI) community in a research study aimed at identifying key values for end-of-life care. BACKGROUND: Hospice care is considered one of the gold standards for meeting the needs of individuals at the end of their life. However, few formal hospice programs exist within AI communities. The lack of access to hospice care among AI communities has created a critical health disparity. In part, this disparity exists because of cultural differences in the values, beliefs, and attitudes towards death and end-of-life care.  In addition, the reservations are isolated, rural, experience a high rate of poverty and have limited access to health care.  Furthermore, the Indian Health Service has focused on acute and infectious diseases. METHODS: Gaining entry into the AI community began slowly with the investigator spending one year doing general networking and one-on-one meetings with potential informants. Progress was accelerated when the investigator began to collaborate with the Montana Consortium for Community Based Participatory Research (CBPR) in Health. During this time, the investigator and a community partner were matched by a common project goal; to develop a culturally appropriate hospice intervention for the AI community. Following the principles of CBPR, a partnership was formed and started conducting the collaborative project. This partnership included health care professionals and research associates from the AI community. Six months of meetings generated an assessment study that explored specific community needs related to end-of-life care and identified recruitment strategies. The recruitment methods included (a) personal contacts via key informants, (b) posters; and (c) local newspaper advertisements. Health Fairs and Powwow were also used for recruitment venues. During the recruitment and contacts, potential study participants were provided the opportunity to have a community liaison present at the interview if desired. RESULTS: A total of 38 participants were identified and contacted by the investigator or community research associates over a three-year period. Of the 33 who agreed to participate, 24 were through personal contacts, 5 were self-identified, 2 were directly approached, one of each were through the awareness projects and word-of-mouth. Posters and newspaper advertisements were unsuccessful in recruiting any participants. Sixteen interviews were conducted without the community liaison; community research associates conducted 17 interviews. IMPLICATION: For this study, the development of personal connections was the cornerstone of success for recruiting older AI adults. The community-at-large, key informants and specific individuals were crucial to making these connections. Recruitment was time-intensive requiring long-term and highly engaged personal relationships, collaboration, and an understanding of the issue from the community’s perspective.
Keywords:
American-Indian; End of life care
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5312
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleRECRUITING OLDER AMERICAN INDIANS FOR DESIGNING HOSPICE INTERVENTIONen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211497-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: To engage the Montana American-Indian (AI) community in a research study aimed at identifying key values for end-of-life care. BACKGROUND: Hospice care is considered one of the gold standards for meeting the needs of individuals at the end of their life. However, few formal hospice programs exist within AI communities. The lack of access to hospice care among AI communities has created a critical health disparity. In part, this disparity exists because of cultural differences in the values, beliefs, and attitudes towards death and end-of-life care.  In addition, the reservations are isolated, rural, experience a high rate of poverty and have limited access to health care.  Furthermore, the Indian Health Service has focused on acute and infectious diseases. METHODS: Gaining entry into the AI community began slowly with the investigator spending one year doing general networking and one-on-one meetings with potential informants. Progress was accelerated when the investigator began to collaborate with the Montana Consortium for Community Based Participatory Research (CBPR) in Health. During this time, the investigator and a community partner were matched by a common project goal; to develop a culturally appropriate hospice intervention for the AI community. Following the principles of CBPR, a partnership was formed and started conducting the collaborative project. This partnership included health care professionals and research associates from the AI community. Six months of meetings generated an assessment study that explored specific community needs related to end-of-life care and identified recruitment strategies. The recruitment methods included (a) personal contacts via key informants, (b) posters; and (c) local newspaper advertisements. Health Fairs and Powwow were also used for recruitment venues. During the recruitment and contacts, potential study participants were provided the opportunity to have a community liaison present at the interview if desired. RESULTS: A total of 38 participants were identified and contacted by the investigator or community research associates over a three-year period. Of the 33 who agreed to participate, 24 were through personal contacts, 5 were self-identified, 2 were directly approached, one of each were through the awareness projects and word-of-mouth. Posters and newspaper advertisements were unsuccessful in recruiting any participants. Sixteen interviews were conducted without the community liaison; community research associates conducted 17 interviews. IMPLICATION: For this study, the development of personal connections was the cornerstone of success for recruiting older AI adults. The community-at-large, key informants and specific individuals were crucial to making these connections. Recruitment was time-intensive requiring long-term and highly engaged personal relationships, collaboration, and an understanding of the issue from the community’s perspective.en_GB
dc.subjectAmerican-Indianen_GB
dc.subjectEnd of life careen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T11:58:36Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T11:58:36Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T11:58:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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