RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION OF OLDER HISPANIC WOMEN IN A PHYSICAL ACTIVITY INTERVENTION

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211500
Type:
Research Study
Title:
RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION OF OLDER HISPANIC WOMEN IN A PHYSICAL ACTIVITY INTERVENTION
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to: (1) present the application of the culturally-based PEN-3 Model for the effective recruitment of older Hispanic women to a community-based physical activity intervention, and (2) offer recommendations for retention of older Hispanic women in physical activity interventions with extended follow up. Rationale: The Hispanic population in the United States is expected to double by 2030, with older adults comprising almost 12% of the aging population.  Many intervention studies report challenges in the recruitment and retention of older adults. Among older Hispanic women, recruitment is even more difficult, with attrition rates in physical activity interventions noted as >52%. Hispanic women remain under studied; recruitment and retention efforts framed within a culturally-based model are essential. Methods: Community-dwelling Hispanic women aged 50 to 87 years old were recruited for randomization to a Wellness Motivation Intervention (WMI) or Attention Control (AC) condition.  The conditions were implemented over 12 weeks, with contact each week. The PEN-3 model allowed a focus on cultural meanings framing women’s relationships with health in social and cultural contexts, including three interrelated domains of cultural identity, relationships and expectations, and cultural empowerment. Cultural identity was reflected in recruitment and retention materials emphasizing love for self, family, and community. Relationships and expectations were reflected in recruitment and retention materials emphasizing hope for the future, engaging in acceptable forms of physical activity, and incorporating support systems. Cultural empowerment was reflected in recruitment and retention materials emphasizing acceptance of self in aging, group support, and the role of the woman in the family. Results: Recruitment was completed within 6 weeks.  Of the 118 women who were screened, ≈ 25% (n = 30) did not meet criteria; 88 were enrolled and randomized to AC (n = 44) and WMI group (n = 44).  The most common reason for exclusion was reporting musculoskeletal problems that prevent participation in moderate-intensity physical activity (20%, n = 6).  Four cohorts participated in WMI sessions (group sizes ranged from 10-12 study participants).  Attrition was ≈ 7% (n = 6) and ≈ 95% (n = 42) of WMI participants successfully completed the intervention. Implications: Recommendations for recruitment and retention of older Hispanic women to physical activity interventions include the application of culturally-based models, providing a framework for including cultural meaning and social context.  
Keywords:
Hispanic women; Physical activity interventions
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5317
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleRECRUITMENT AND RETENTION OF OLDER HISPANIC WOMEN IN A PHYSICAL ACTIVITY INTERVENTIONen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211500-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this paper is to: (1) present the application of the culturally-based PEN-3 Model for the effective recruitment of older Hispanic women to a community-based physical activity intervention, and (2) offer recommendations for retention of older Hispanic women in physical activity interventions with extended follow up. Rationale: The Hispanic population in the United States is expected to double by 2030, with older adults comprising almost 12% of the aging population.  Many intervention studies report challenges in the recruitment and retention of older adults. Among older Hispanic women, recruitment is even more difficult, with attrition rates in physical activity interventions noted as >52%. Hispanic women remain under studied; recruitment and retention efforts framed within a culturally-based model are essential. Methods: Community-dwelling Hispanic women aged 50 to 87 years old were recruited for randomization to a Wellness Motivation Intervention (WMI) or Attention Control (AC) condition.  The conditions were implemented over 12 weeks, with contact each week. The PEN-3 model allowed a focus on cultural meanings framing women’s relationships with health in social and cultural contexts, including three interrelated domains of cultural identity, relationships and expectations, and cultural empowerment. Cultural identity was reflected in recruitment and retention materials emphasizing love for self, family, and community. Relationships and expectations were reflected in recruitment and retention materials emphasizing hope for the future, engaging in acceptable forms of physical activity, and incorporating support systems. Cultural empowerment was reflected in recruitment and retention materials emphasizing acceptance of self in aging, group support, and the role of the woman in the family. Results: Recruitment was completed within 6 weeks.  Of the 118 women who were screened, ≈ 25% (n = 30) did not meet criteria; 88 were enrolled and randomized to AC (n = 44) and WMI group (n = 44).  The most common reason for exclusion was reporting musculoskeletal problems that prevent participation in moderate-intensity physical activity (20%, n = 6).  Four cohorts participated in WMI sessions (group sizes ranged from 10-12 study participants).  Attrition was ≈ 7% (n = 6) and ≈ 95% (n = 42) of WMI participants successfully completed the intervention. Implications: Recommendations for recruitment and retention of older Hispanic women to physical activity interventions include the application of culturally-based models, providing a framework for including cultural meaning and social context.  en_GB
dc.subjectHispanic womenen_GB
dc.subjectPhysical activity interventionsen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T11:58:47Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T11:58:47Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T11:58:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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