2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211501
Type:
Research Study
Title:
SYMPTOM CLUSTERS DURING THE MENOPAUSAL TRANSITION AND EARLY POSTMENOPAUSE
Abstract:
Purposes:  Identify symptom clusters that characterize women’s experiences through the late reproductive stage, the menopausal transition and early postmenopause; and explore the influence of the menopausal transition stages and early postmenopause, compared to the late reproductive stage, on the clusters of symptoms women experience. Background: Although investigators have not identified a true “menopausal syndrome”, there is evidence that symptoms women experience during the menopausal transition tend to cluster together. Our earlier investigation of symptom clusters during the late menopausal transition stage, a period of peak prevalence and symptom intensity for many women, revealed four symptom clusters based on data from symptom diary ratings of the severity of hot flashes, problem concentrating, joint aches, mood changes, and night-time awakening. In our efforts to extend our understanding of the types of and stability of symptom clusters women experience throughout the transition through menopause, we undertook analysis of symptom clusters through the late reproductive stage of reproductive aging, the early and late stages of menopausal transition, and the early postmenopause. Methods:  Participants from the Seattle Midlife Women’s Health Study who were staged provided data for a total of 6857 occasions.  Multilevel latent class analysis was used to identify classes using scores for hot flashes and symptom groups (sleep, cognitive, mood, pain, tension). Results:  Class 1 included observations of low severity levels for all symptoms, whereas class 2 included low severity hot flashes and moderate severity levels for all other symptom groups.  Class 3 included high severity hot flashes with lower severity levels of all other symptom groups.  During the early and late menopausal transitions stages and early postmenopause, the likelihood of being in class 3 was significantly greater than being in class 1.  There were no significant effects of menopausal transition stages on the likelihood of being in class 2.  Implications: This effort is the first to examine latent classes or clusters of symptoms over the prolonged period from late reproductive stage through early postmenopause.  Because all three classes of symptoms are likely to occur during the menopausal transition and postmenopause, women will benefit from clinicians attending to the specific groups of symptoms they experience and considering multi-symptom approaches to therapeutics.   
Keywords:
Menopausal transition; Menopause symptoms
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5320
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleSYMPTOM CLUSTERS DURING THE MENOPAUSAL TRANSITION AND EARLY POSTMENOPAUSEen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211501-
dc.description.abstractPurposes:  Identify symptom clusters that characterize women’s experiences through the late reproductive stage, the menopausal transition and early postmenopause; and explore the influence of the menopausal transition stages and early postmenopause, compared to the late reproductive stage, on the clusters of symptoms women experience. Background: Although investigators have not identified a true “menopausal syndrome”, there is evidence that symptoms women experience during the menopausal transition tend to cluster together. Our earlier investigation of symptom clusters during the late menopausal transition stage, a period of peak prevalence and symptom intensity for many women, revealed four symptom clusters based on data from symptom diary ratings of the severity of hot flashes, problem concentrating, joint aches, mood changes, and night-time awakening. In our efforts to extend our understanding of the types of and stability of symptom clusters women experience throughout the transition through menopause, we undertook analysis of symptom clusters through the late reproductive stage of reproductive aging, the early and late stages of menopausal transition, and the early postmenopause. Methods:  Participants from the Seattle Midlife Women’s Health Study who were staged provided data for a total of 6857 occasions.  Multilevel latent class analysis was used to identify classes using scores for hot flashes and symptom groups (sleep, cognitive, mood, pain, tension). Results:  Class 1 included observations of low severity levels for all symptoms, whereas class 2 included low severity hot flashes and moderate severity levels for all other symptom groups.  Class 3 included high severity hot flashes with lower severity levels of all other symptom groups.  During the early and late menopausal transitions stages and early postmenopause, the likelihood of being in class 3 was significantly greater than being in class 1.  There were no significant effects of menopausal transition stages on the likelihood of being in class 2.  Implications: This effort is the first to examine latent classes or clusters of symptoms over the prolonged period from late reproductive stage through early postmenopause.  Because all three classes of symptoms are likely to occur during the menopausal transition and postmenopause, women will benefit from clinicians attending to the specific groups of symptoms they experience and considering multi-symptom approaches to therapeutics.   en_GB
dc.subjectMenopausal transitionen_GB
dc.subjectMenopause symptomsen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T11:58:50Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T11:58:50Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T11:58:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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