2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211503
Type:
Research Study
Title:
THE MEANING OF COMFORT FOR THE HOSPITALIZED CHILD: AN INTERPRETIVE DESCRIPTION
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore the meaning of comfort for hospitalized school-age child through interpretive description to capture conceptual themes and patterns that will inform a middle-range theory of comfort for children. Background: Comfort of the hospitalized child is a complex, multidimensional and subjective phenomenon. It represents a challenge for children, parents and health professionals. In the United States, over 3 million children are hospitalized every year and 42% of these children are 6 years of age and older (National Association of Children’s Hospitals and Related Institutions, 2009). Most endure one or more painful procedures as part of the management of their hospital care. Anxiety surrounding being hurt is identified as the biggest fear of the hospitalized child (Slaw, Stephens, & Holmes, 1986). One of the central themes of nursing care for the pediatric patient is to relieve this anxiety and enhance comfort and healing. Nurses contract with parents to achieve this goal (Pruitt, Johnson, Elliot, & Polley, 2008). Despite advances in relief of pain and anxiety, the concept of comfort is not well-defined for the hospitalized child. Sample/Setting: Purposive sampling of key informants for this study will be school-age children and their families. Acutely ill and chronically ill children and their families will be sampled. In addition, expert nurses will be interviewed who have identified expertise in comforting the hospitalized child. The setting is an in-patient, medical-surgical unit in a 359-bed children’s hospital in Mid-Western United States. Methods: An interpretive description method will be utilized. Interpretive description explicitly locates itself within a philosophical tradition that explores matters involving human experience (Thorne, 2004). The more probable truths are those that are arrived at using multiple angels of vision (Johnson, 1996; Kikuchi & Simmons, 1996; Sandelowski, 1996). Interpretive description acknowledges the constructed and contextual nature of human experience and concurrently allows for shared realities (Thorne, Reimer Kirkham, & MacDonald-Emes, 1997). Developmentally sensitive, semi-structured interviews designed to explore the key informants’ perceptions of the meaning of comfort will be utilized to gather data. The interviews will be transcribed and analyzed through a series of steps based on immersion and crystallization techniques which provide an iterative, contemplative and reflexive approach to data analysis. An essential element in the method is that the investigator is the interpreter of the data and generates findings that have the potential for interpretive authority beyond the artistic license of the individual author (Thorne, 1997). Results/Implications: The results of this study will be interpreted themes regarding comfort. Multiple implications for practice application and clinical research are expected. An interpretive description of comfort will systematically harvest shared and patterned experiential knowledge so it can be of used in sensitizing and informing the people who are providing care to children in multiple health care arenas.
Keywords:
Child hospitalization; Comfort as outcome
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5325
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleTHE MEANING OF COMFORT FOR THE HOSPITALIZED CHILD: AN INTERPRETIVE DESCRIPTIONen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211503-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this study is to explore the meaning of comfort for hospitalized school-age child through interpretive description to capture conceptual themes and patterns that will inform a middle-range theory of comfort for children. Background: Comfort of the hospitalized child is a complex, multidimensional and subjective phenomenon. It represents a challenge for children, parents and health professionals. In the United States, over 3 million children are hospitalized every year and 42% of these children are 6 years of age and older (National Association of Children’s Hospitals and Related Institutions, 2009). Most endure one or more painful procedures as part of the management of their hospital care. Anxiety surrounding being hurt is identified as the biggest fear of the hospitalized child (Slaw, Stephens, & Holmes, 1986). One of the central themes of nursing care for the pediatric patient is to relieve this anxiety and enhance comfort and healing. Nurses contract with parents to achieve this goal (Pruitt, Johnson, Elliot, & Polley, 2008). Despite advances in relief of pain and anxiety, the concept of comfort is not well-defined for the hospitalized child. Sample/Setting: Purposive sampling of key informants for this study will be school-age children and their families. Acutely ill and chronically ill children and their families will be sampled. In addition, expert nurses will be interviewed who have identified expertise in comforting the hospitalized child. The setting is an in-patient, medical-surgical unit in a 359-bed children’s hospital in Mid-Western United States. Methods: An interpretive description method will be utilized. Interpretive description explicitly locates itself within a philosophical tradition that explores matters involving human experience (Thorne, 2004). The more probable truths are those that are arrived at using multiple angels of vision (Johnson, 1996; Kikuchi & Simmons, 1996; Sandelowski, 1996). Interpretive description acknowledges the constructed and contextual nature of human experience and concurrently allows for shared realities (Thorne, Reimer Kirkham, & MacDonald-Emes, 1997). Developmentally sensitive, semi-structured interviews designed to explore the key informants’ perceptions of the meaning of comfort will be utilized to gather data. The interviews will be transcribed and analyzed through a series of steps based on immersion and crystallization techniques which provide an iterative, contemplative and reflexive approach to data analysis. An essential element in the method is that the investigator is the interpreter of the data and generates findings that have the potential for interpretive authority beyond the artistic license of the individual author (Thorne, 1997). Results/Implications: The results of this study will be interpreted themes regarding comfort. Multiple implications for practice application and clinical research are expected. An interpretive description of comfort will systematically harvest shared and patterned experiential knowledge so it can be of used in sensitizing and informing the people who are providing care to children in multiple health care arenas.en_GB
dc.subjectChild hospitalizationen_GB
dc.subjectComfort as outcomeen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T11:58:57Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T11:58:57Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T11:58:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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