2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211508
Type:
Research Study
Title:
RECRUITMENT FOR A RURAL TELEHEALTH INTERVENTION on DIABETES SELF-MANAGEMENT
Abstract:
Background: Recruiting rural and underserved participants in behavioral health interventions has proven challenging. Community-based recruitment approaches have shown promise, but these approaches are not always feasible in multi-site, cross-regional interventions. Purpose: This study evaluates the feasibility of a modified approach- a structured, rapid collaborative approach- to engage clinic site coordinators to recruit and engage participants, allowing for more rapid participant engagement than traditional approaches. This approach involved reaching out to communities with established ties with the investigators, meeting with providers and coordinators in each community to establish recruitment strategies and providing a financial stipend to offset cost of onsite coordination. Methods: Adults with diabetes were recruited from rural Federally Qualified Health Center clinics. Recruitment feasibility was assessed by analyzing the site and participant recruitment process as reflected in the field notes of the project manager, health coaches, and other team members, and 8 in-depth, semi-structured interviews with clinic site coordinators and champions conducted after the study concluded. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the field notes and interviews. Findings: Forty-seven rural sites were contacted to obtain the 6 sites that participated in the study, yielding 121 participants.  Facilitators to site recruitment included offering site stipends, prior relationship or reputation of group initiating the project, and the opportunity to improve diabetes services.  Deterrents to recruitment were HIPPA requirements hindering research staff from direct contact with potential participants.  The primary facilitator for participant recruitment was the opportunity to receive nurse coaching to help manage diabetes.  Deterrents to participation were lack of transportation for initial study orientation, complexity and volume of study materials in areas with low literacy rates and a distrust of research. Conclusion: The structured, rapid collaborative approach led to quick and efficient recruitment of clinic sites and participant recruitment success in some, but not all, rural sites. The study highlights the opportunities and challenges of recruiting rural clinics and rural, underserved participants in multisite research and identifies suggestions for improving recruitment for future interventions.
Keywords:
Community based recruitment approaches; Behavioral health interventions
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5332
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleRECRUITMENT FOR A RURAL TELEHEALTH INTERVENTION on DIABETES SELF-MANAGEMENTen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211508-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Recruiting rural and underserved participants in behavioral health interventions has proven challenging. Community-based recruitment approaches have shown promise, but these approaches are not always feasible in multi-site, cross-regional interventions. Purpose: This study evaluates the feasibility of a modified approach- a structured, rapid collaborative approach- to engage clinic site coordinators to recruit and engage participants, allowing for more rapid participant engagement than traditional approaches. This approach involved reaching out to communities with established ties with the investigators, meeting with providers and coordinators in each community to establish recruitment strategies and providing a financial stipend to offset cost of onsite coordination. Methods: Adults with diabetes were recruited from rural Federally Qualified Health Center clinics. Recruitment feasibility was assessed by analyzing the site and participant recruitment process as reflected in the field notes of the project manager, health coaches, and other team members, and 8 in-depth, semi-structured interviews with clinic site coordinators and champions conducted after the study concluded. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the field notes and interviews. Findings: Forty-seven rural sites were contacted to obtain the 6 sites that participated in the study, yielding 121 participants.  Facilitators to site recruitment included offering site stipends, prior relationship or reputation of group initiating the project, and the opportunity to improve diabetes services.  Deterrents to recruitment were HIPPA requirements hindering research staff from direct contact with potential participants.  The primary facilitator for participant recruitment was the opportunity to receive nurse coaching to help manage diabetes.  Deterrents to participation were lack of transportation for initial study orientation, complexity and volume of study materials in areas with low literacy rates and a distrust of research. Conclusion: The structured, rapid collaborative approach led to quick and efficient recruitment of clinic sites and participant recruitment success in some, but not all, rural sites. The study highlights the opportunities and challenges of recruiting rural clinics and rural, underserved participants in multisite research and identifies suggestions for improving recruitment for future interventions.en_GB
dc.subjectCommunity based recruitment approachesen_GB
dc.subjectBehavioral health interventionsen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T11:59:15Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T11:59:15Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T11:59:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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