2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211510
Type:
Research Study
Title:
VIDEO GAME THERAPY FOR PEOPLE WITH PARKINSON'S DISEASE (PD)
Abstract:
Purposes/Aims: To 1) develop a suite of nine clinically inspired computer-based video games designed to improve gait and balance in people with PD; 2) pilot test the effects of game play on stride length, gait velocity, and subjective balance confidence. Background: People with PD experience severe gait and balance impairments making them at high risk for falls. Rehabilitation interventions are, therefore, targeted to improve balance, mobility and strength. Gaming platforms can encourage therapeutic activity at home and be challenging and fun. In this study, clinical and software partners adapted a classroom gait balance training program for people with PD to a videogame platform. Methods: The health games were created by teams at XXXX and XXXX through an innovative software development process, CALICO, designed by XXXX. That process, as applied to these games, includes the following components: C: Clinically defined motions (e.g., truncal rotation, upper and lower extremity gestures that cross the midline, sit to stand, reciprocal extremity movements). A: Adaptive games designed to elicit defined motions. The software design team developed game ideas for each of the clinically defined motions using a real-time 3D programming environment (Unity 3D: Unity Technologies, San Francisco, CA) and a sensor system to detect and track desired and compensatory motions. L: Level design to create progressive difficulty staircase. Regardless of subjects’ level of function, game difficulty was calibrated to ensure success. As performance improved, game play difficulty increased. Each game had five levels of difficulty. I: Iterative prototype testing with subjects. Multiple rounds of design/evaluate/re-design/re-evaluate were carried out based on subject and clinician feedback during all phases including a one-month in-home evaluation. C: Clinical evaluation. A 12-week trial to evaluate the impact of game play on clinical outcome variables was conducted. Subjects were prescribed a personalized gaming regime and instructed to play the games for 50 minutes three times a week. Safety and compliance were monitored via the web portal and weekly phone calls. O: Online tracking for clinician oversight and ongoing tuning.  The sensor technology communicated via blue tooth and Wi-Fi to an encrypted web portal. Subjects accessed their individual or cumulative game play via the portal link on the menu screen. The research team also tracked game play time, intensity and duration through the portal. Results: Nine video games that elicited clinically therapeutic movements were developed. The motion tracking sensor embedded suit transmitted data successfully to the web portal. Data were able to be accessed by subjects, clinical and software design team members. Clinical evaluation data were encouraging with 65% of game players (n=20) demonstrating longer stride length; 55% increased gait velocity, and 55% reporting improved balance confidence after playing the games for 12 weeks. Implications: This study shows that clinically inspired custom designed games that promote therapeutic movements are feasible. The web-based telemedicine link connecting patients from their homes remotely to their health care providers increases access, increases clinician’s ability to fine tuning treatments in real time, and decreases travel costs.
Keywords:
Parkinson Disease; Balance improvement; Video game, therapy
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5336
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleVIDEO GAME THERAPY FOR PEOPLE WITH PARKINSON'S DISEASE (PD)en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211510-
dc.description.abstractPurposes/Aims: To 1) develop a suite of nine clinically inspired computer-based video games designed to improve gait and balance in people with PD; 2) pilot test the effects of game play on stride length, gait velocity, and subjective balance confidence. Background: People with PD experience severe gait and balance impairments making them at high risk for falls. Rehabilitation interventions are, therefore, targeted to improve balance, mobility and strength. Gaming platforms can encourage therapeutic activity at home and be challenging and fun. In this study, clinical and software partners adapted a classroom gait balance training program for people with PD to a videogame platform. Methods: The health games were created by teams at XXXX and XXXX through an innovative software development process, CALICO, designed by XXXX. That process, as applied to these games, includes the following components: C: Clinically defined motions (e.g., truncal rotation, upper and lower extremity gestures that cross the midline, sit to stand, reciprocal extremity movements). A: Adaptive games designed to elicit defined motions. The software design team developed game ideas for each of the clinically defined motions using a real-time 3D programming environment (Unity 3D: Unity Technologies, San Francisco, CA) and a sensor system to detect and track desired and compensatory motions. L: Level design to create progressive difficulty staircase. Regardless of subjects’ level of function, game difficulty was calibrated to ensure success. As performance improved, game play difficulty increased. Each game had five levels of difficulty. I: Iterative prototype testing with subjects. Multiple rounds of design/evaluate/re-design/re-evaluate were carried out based on subject and clinician feedback during all phases including a one-month in-home evaluation. C: Clinical evaluation. A 12-week trial to evaluate the impact of game play on clinical outcome variables was conducted. Subjects were prescribed a personalized gaming regime and instructed to play the games for 50 minutes three times a week. Safety and compliance were monitored via the web portal and weekly phone calls. O: Online tracking for clinician oversight and ongoing tuning.  The sensor technology communicated via blue tooth and Wi-Fi to an encrypted web portal. Subjects accessed their individual or cumulative game play via the portal link on the menu screen. The research team also tracked game play time, intensity and duration through the portal. Results: Nine video games that elicited clinically therapeutic movements were developed. The motion tracking sensor embedded suit transmitted data successfully to the web portal. Data were able to be accessed by subjects, clinical and software design team members. Clinical evaluation data were encouraging with 65% of game players (n=20) demonstrating longer stride length; 55% increased gait velocity, and 55% reporting improved balance confidence after playing the games for 12 weeks. Implications: This study shows that clinically inspired custom designed games that promote therapeutic movements are feasible. The web-based telemedicine link connecting patients from their homes remotely to their health care providers increases access, increases clinician’s ability to fine tuning treatments in real time, and decreases travel costs.en_GB
dc.subjectParkinson Diseaseen_GB
dc.subjectBalance improvementen_GB
dc.subjectVideo game, therapyen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T11:59:22Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T11:59:22Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T11:59:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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