PARTICIPATION IN A FACE-TO-FACE VS. AN INTERNET DYSPNEA SELF-MANAGEMENT PROGRAM

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211512
Type:
Research Study
Title:
PARTICIPATION IN A FACE-TO-FACE VS. AN INTERNET DYSPNEA SELF-MANAGEMENT PROGRAM
Abstract:
Background: The effectiveness of behavior change programs has been shown to be related to the amount of exposure to the intervention. We designed two dyspnea self-management programs (DSMPs) that were as similar in content as possible, but delivered via either traditional (fDSMP) or Internet (eDSMP) modalities. These groups were compared with a general health education control group (GHE). Aim: Compare the number of monthly education sessions (face-to-face meetings or text chats), biweekly follow-up contacts (telephone calls or email secure messages), and daily exercise and symptom log entries (paper or web/smartphone) across the 3 groups during the 12 month program. Methods: Participants with COPD from two clinical sites were randomized to the eDSMP (n=43), fDSMP (n=41) or GHE (n=41). The content of the two DSMPs which focused on motivational interviewing, education, skills training, and ongoing support for dyspnea self-management was similar. The fDSMP participated in face-to-face group education sessions and telephone follow-up, and the eDSMP participated in group education sessions via text chats and email for follow-ups. The GHE group participated in face-to-face group health education sessions and received follow-up telephone calls. Frequency of successful follow-up contacts (28 contacts), participation in the educational sessions (6 possible sessions), and completion of daily exercise and symptom logs (365 maximum) either with paper and pencil or smartphone were tabulated. Results: Participants in the fDSMP group attended the most number of educational sessions but was only significantly different from that of the GHE (fDSMP: 4.4±2.1, eDSMP: 3.1±2.2, and GHE: 2.2±2.1). Participants in the eDSMP group completed the most biweekly follow-up contacts but was only significantly different from that of the GHE (eDSMP: 24.1±6.1; fDSMP 21.8±7.3; GHE 19.2±6.8). Participants in both DSMP groups completed similar numbers of exercise (eDSMP: 195±135, fDSMP: 210±139) and symptom (eDSMP: 184±147, fDSMP: 202±140) logs. Implications: Participation in the three core intervention components of the DSMP were similar whether or not patients were in the eDSMP or fDSMP groups.  Although we found that use of Internet and mobile tools in this study did not enhance participation, qualitative feedback from participants suggest that future self-management research should focus less on testing intervention delivery channels but rather on the effects of tailoring information and communication tools according to patient preferences. 
Keywords:
Behavioral management, Face-to-face versus text chats
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5341
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titlePARTICIPATION IN A FACE-TO-FACE VS. AN INTERNET DYSPNEA SELF-MANAGEMENT PROGRAMen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211512-
dc.description.abstractBackground: The effectiveness of behavior change programs has been shown to be related to the amount of exposure to the intervention. We designed two dyspnea self-management programs (DSMPs) that were as similar in content as possible, but delivered via either traditional (fDSMP) or Internet (eDSMP) modalities. These groups were compared with a general health education control group (GHE). Aim: Compare the number of monthly education sessions (face-to-face meetings or text chats), biweekly follow-up contacts (telephone calls or email secure messages), and daily exercise and symptom log entries (paper or web/smartphone) across the 3 groups during the 12 month program. Methods: Participants with COPD from two clinical sites were randomized to the eDSMP (n=43), fDSMP (n=41) or GHE (n=41). The content of the two DSMPs which focused on motivational interviewing, education, skills training, and ongoing support for dyspnea self-management was similar. The fDSMP participated in face-to-face group education sessions and telephone follow-up, and the eDSMP participated in group education sessions via text chats and email for follow-ups. The GHE group participated in face-to-face group health education sessions and received follow-up telephone calls. Frequency of successful follow-up contacts (28 contacts), participation in the educational sessions (6 possible sessions), and completion of daily exercise and symptom logs (365 maximum) either with paper and pencil or smartphone were tabulated. Results: Participants in the fDSMP group attended the most number of educational sessions but was only significantly different from that of the GHE (fDSMP: 4.4±2.1, eDSMP: 3.1±2.2, and GHE: 2.2±2.1). Participants in the eDSMP group completed the most biweekly follow-up contacts but was only significantly different from that of the GHE (eDSMP: 24.1±6.1; fDSMP 21.8±7.3; GHE 19.2±6.8). Participants in both DSMP groups completed similar numbers of exercise (eDSMP: 195±135, fDSMP: 210±139) and symptom (eDSMP: 184±147, fDSMP: 202±140) logs. Implications: Participation in the three core intervention components of the DSMP were similar whether or not patients were in the eDSMP or fDSMP groups.  Although we found that use of Internet and mobile tools in this study did not enhance participation, qualitative feedback from participants suggest that future self-management research should focus less on testing intervention delivery channels but rather on the effects of tailoring information and communication tools according to patient preferences. en_GB
dc.subjectBehavioral management, Face-to-face versus text chatsen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T11:59:29Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T11:59:29Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T11:59:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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