ACUPUNCTURE FOR HOT FLASHES AND ASSOCIATED SYMPTOMS: EVIDENCE FROM A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211513
Type:
Research Study
Title:
ACUPUNCTURE FOR HOT FLASHES AND ASSOCIATED SYMPTOMS: EVIDENCE FROM A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW
Abstract:
Purpose/Aims:  We reviewed controlled clinical trials (CCTs) of acupuncture’s effects on hot flashes and at least one other associated symptom including sleep, cognitive function, mood, and pain. Women studied were in the menopausal transition and early postmenopause. Rationale/conceptual Basis/Background:  Acupuncture has effectively treated myriad symptoms over at least two millennia. Recently, much interest has been generated regarding acupuncture’s effectiveness in treating menopausal hot flashes (HFs). This is due in part to women’s concerns about the use of hormone replacement due to potentially increased adverse risks (Hulley et al., 1998; Writing Group for the Women’s Health Initiative Investigators, 2002). Therefore, we reviewed all the CCTs of acupuncture for the treatment of MT symptoms to provide summarized information on this modality. Methods: A systematic review of randomized CCTs published between 2004 and 2011 revealed nine trials of acupuncture in which women reported the frequency, severity, bother or interference associated with HFs and at least one other associated symptom (sleep, mood, cognitive functioning, pain). Results:  A total of seven CCTs found statistically significant improvement in HFs and other symptoms with acupuncture (sleep, pain, cognitive functioning, mood). Five of those studies compared acupuncture with sham acupuncture, of which two studies reported that acupuncture and sham acupuncture were both significantly beneficial.  One study grouped their data according to ‘responders’ and non-responders to the acupuncture intervention and found there were no significant differences between the two groups in their Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) diagnosis.  Lastly, one study found at six and twelve months follow-up that initial findings of significant improvement with twelve weeks’ acupuncture care were no longer present, suggesting that acupuncture has no long-term effect on HF frequency. Implications: Acupuncture offers promise in the management of multiple symptoms during the menopausal transition and early postmenopause. Significant findings were found with twelve weeks’ treatment. However, only one study followed up participants at six and twelve months. They found that initial significant improvement at twelve weeks had dropped off at follow-up. Further longitudinal studies are needed to determine the effectiveness trajectory of acupuncture. No study reported harms or adverse events. We conclude that acupuncture is a safe and possibly effective treatment for hot flashes and other related symptoms such as sleep, mood, cognitive functioning and pain. Further investigations are also warranted regarding sham acupuncture to determine if it truly is a sham intervention.
Keywords:
Hot flashes; Menopause; Acupuncture
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5343
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleACUPUNCTURE FOR HOT FLASHES AND ASSOCIATED SYMPTOMS: EVIDENCE FROM A SYSTEMATIC REVIEWen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211513-
dc.description.abstractPurpose/Aims:  We reviewed controlled clinical trials (CCTs) of acupuncture’s effects on hot flashes and at least one other associated symptom including sleep, cognitive function, mood, and pain. Women studied were in the menopausal transition and early postmenopause. Rationale/conceptual Basis/Background:  Acupuncture has effectively treated myriad symptoms over at least two millennia. Recently, much interest has been generated regarding acupuncture’s effectiveness in treating menopausal hot flashes (HFs). This is due in part to women’s concerns about the use of hormone replacement due to potentially increased adverse risks (Hulley et al., 1998; Writing Group for the Women’s Health Initiative Investigators, 2002). Therefore, we reviewed all the CCTs of acupuncture for the treatment of MT symptoms to provide summarized information on this modality. Methods: A systematic review of randomized CCTs published between 2004 and 2011 revealed nine trials of acupuncture in which women reported the frequency, severity, bother or interference associated with HFs and at least one other associated symptom (sleep, mood, cognitive functioning, pain). Results:  A total of seven CCTs found statistically significant improvement in HFs and other symptoms with acupuncture (sleep, pain, cognitive functioning, mood). Five of those studies compared acupuncture with sham acupuncture, of which two studies reported that acupuncture and sham acupuncture were both significantly beneficial.  One study grouped their data according to ‘responders’ and non-responders to the acupuncture intervention and found there were no significant differences between the two groups in their Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) diagnosis.  Lastly, one study found at six and twelve months follow-up that initial findings of significant improvement with twelve weeks’ acupuncture care were no longer present, suggesting that acupuncture has no long-term effect on HF frequency. Implications: Acupuncture offers promise in the management of multiple symptoms during the menopausal transition and early postmenopause. Significant findings were found with twelve weeks’ treatment. However, only one study followed up participants at six and twelve months. They found that initial significant improvement at twelve weeks had dropped off at follow-up. Further longitudinal studies are needed to determine the effectiveness trajectory of acupuncture. No study reported harms or adverse events. We conclude that acupuncture is a safe and possibly effective treatment for hot flashes and other related symptoms such as sleep, mood, cognitive functioning and pain. Further investigations are also warranted regarding sham acupuncture to determine if it truly is a sham intervention.en_GB
dc.subjectHot flashesen_GB
dc.subjectMenopauseen_GB
dc.subjectAcupunctureen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T11:59:32Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T11:59:32Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T11:59:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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