2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211515
Type:
Research Study
Title:
SOY FOR HOT FLASHES AND ASSOCIATED SYMPTOMS: EVIDENCE FROM A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW
Abstract:
Purpose/Aims: Review controlled clinical trials of soy and isoflavone preparation  effects on hot flashes and at least one other symptom including sleep, cognitive function, mood, and pain symptoms women report during the menopausal transition and early postmenopause. Rationale:  Soy and isoflavone preparations have been effective for treatment of hot flashes in some clinical trials, but not in others, with results depending on the dose and type of preparation.  In addition, results differ for women who are equol-producers and those who are not.  To date there have been no systematic reviews of effects of these preparations on multiple symptoms. Methods: A systematic review of randomized, controlled clinical trials published between 2004 and 2011 revealed 15 clinical trials of soy or isoflavone preparations in which women reported the frequency, severity, bother or interference associated with hot flashes and at least one other symptom from these groups:  sleep, mood, cognitive functioning, pain. Results: Of the 15 trials reviewed, soy preparations were used in 4 trials, isoflavone preparations in the remainder.  Two of the trials used equol-producing soy or s-equol supplements. Controls included placebo, including a casein protein placebo for isoflavone soy protein, wheat muffins, and placebo soy.  Comparison therapies included estrogen, tibolone, calcium and Vitamin D, and lifestyle changes.  Of the 15 trials reviewed, 11 trials used soy with varying concentrations of Genistein, Daidzein and Glycetein isoflavones.  Nine of the 11 soy preparations had positive results resulting in decreased hot flashes (45-80%).  Two trials indicated that at least 60-70 mg of isoflavones per day was required to significantly reduce vasomotor, sleep, cognitive and pain symptoms.  Equol supplements of 30 mg/d for non-Equol producing women showed significant decreases in vasomotor, psychological and somatic symptoms.  Two trials indicated that single Genistein preparations reduced hot flashes by 30-51%, but were not significant for Green Climacteric Scores of psychological, vasomotor or somatic symptoms.  Red Clover isoflavone (80 mg/d) significantly reduced hot flashes, night sweats, sleep, cognitive and pain symptoms using Kupperman Index scores.  Soy milk and soymilk+exercise (walking 1 hour/day) significantly decreased hot flashes (by 72-83%) and decreased sleep, cognition and joint pain symptoms by 18-52%.  Implications:  Soy and isoflavones may offer promise in management of multiple symptoms during the menopausal transition and early postmenopause.  Differentiating women who are equol-producers from those who are not will be useful to clinicians prescribing these therapies.  Further research is needed to develop tools to identify these women in a cost-effective way.
Keywords:
Hot flashes; Menopause; Soy; Isoflavone
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5345
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleSOY FOR HOT FLASHES AND ASSOCIATED SYMPTOMS: EVIDENCE FROM A SYSTEMATIC REVIEWen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211515-
dc.description.abstractPurpose/Aims: Review controlled clinical trials of soy and isoflavone preparation  effects on hot flashes and at least one other symptom including sleep, cognitive function, mood, and pain symptoms women report during the menopausal transition and early postmenopause. Rationale:  Soy and isoflavone preparations have been effective for treatment of hot flashes in some clinical trials, but not in others, with results depending on the dose and type of preparation.  In addition, results differ for women who are equol-producers and those who are not.  To date there have been no systematic reviews of effects of these preparations on multiple symptoms. Methods: A systematic review of randomized, controlled clinical trials published between 2004 and 2011 revealed 15 clinical trials of soy or isoflavone preparations in which women reported the frequency, severity, bother or interference associated with hot flashes and at least one other symptom from these groups:  sleep, mood, cognitive functioning, pain. Results: Of the 15 trials reviewed, soy preparations were used in 4 trials, isoflavone preparations in the remainder.  Two of the trials used equol-producing soy or s-equol supplements. Controls included placebo, including a casein protein placebo for isoflavone soy protein, wheat muffins, and placebo soy.  Comparison therapies included estrogen, tibolone, calcium and Vitamin D, and lifestyle changes.  Of the 15 trials reviewed, 11 trials used soy with varying concentrations of Genistein, Daidzein and Glycetein isoflavones.  Nine of the 11 soy preparations had positive results resulting in decreased hot flashes (45-80%).  Two trials indicated that at least 60-70 mg of isoflavones per day was required to significantly reduce vasomotor, sleep, cognitive and pain symptoms.  Equol supplements of 30 mg/d for non-Equol producing women showed significant decreases in vasomotor, psychological and somatic symptoms.  Two trials indicated that single Genistein preparations reduced hot flashes by 30-51%, but were not significant for Green Climacteric Scores of psychological, vasomotor or somatic symptoms.  Red Clover isoflavone (80 mg/d) significantly reduced hot flashes, night sweats, sleep, cognitive and pain symptoms using Kupperman Index scores.  Soy milk and soymilk+exercise (walking 1 hour/day) significantly decreased hot flashes (by 72-83%) and decreased sleep, cognition and joint pain symptoms by 18-52%.  Implications:  Soy and isoflavones may offer promise in management of multiple symptoms during the menopausal transition and early postmenopause.  Differentiating women who are equol-producers from those who are not will be useful to clinicians prescribing these therapies.  Further research is needed to develop tools to identify these women in a cost-effective way.en_GB
dc.subjectHot flashesen_GB
dc.subjectMenopauseen_GB
dc.subjectSoyen_GB
dc.subjectIsoflavoneen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T11:59:39Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T11:59:39Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T11:59:39Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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