2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211516
Type:
Research Study
Title:
NEW INSIGHTS INTO APPLYING MOBILE PERSUASIVE TECHNOLOGIES TO CLINICAL TRIALS
Abstract:
Background and Purposes: The rapid growth of mobile technologies is creating new possibilities for the development of behavioral interventions in nursing research. However, it remains unclear as to how to design an effective behavioral intervention using mobile technologies.  Thus, we need to understand how to utilize mobile phones effectively in order to develop innovative outreach and intervention strategies aimed at promoting healthy lifestyles or managing chronic illnesses. Fortunately, we have had the opportunity to conduct three mobile health (mHealth) clinical trials involving behavioral interventions to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. The purposes of this paper are to describe new insights from these mHealth clinical trials and how to apply mobile technologies to behavioral interventions in a diverse sample of sedentary adults. Methods and Discussions: In our mHealth trails, the mobile phone has been used as a means of delivering behavioral interventions, setting short and long-term goals, providing a self-monitoring tool (e.g. diary), giving real-time feedback, social support, and reminders, and capturing real-time data in a total of 165 sedentary adults (age 26 to 70 years). In this presentation, short and long-term adherence over a 9-month period in using these mobile phone functions will be discussed. We will also describe adherence rates in relation to older age, no mobile phone use prior to the trial enrollment, and low health literacy after controlling for potential confounding factors. Specific considerations for designing mobile health behavioral interventions will be highlighted. Implications: A systematic analyses of these extensive clinical trial datasets can move nursing science forward. With the rapid pace of mobile technological development, clinical trials with innovative approaches will help in the design of more effective behavioral interventions for mHealth. Funding sources: This paper was supported by NIH/NCRR NINR K23NR011454 and by NHLBI 5RO1HL104147.
Keywords:
Nursing research; Behavioral interventions; Mobile technologies
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5346
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleNEW INSIGHTS INTO APPLYING MOBILE PERSUASIVE TECHNOLOGIES TO CLINICAL TRIALSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211516-
dc.description.abstractBackground and Purposes: The rapid growth of mobile technologies is creating new possibilities for the development of behavioral interventions in nursing research. However, it remains unclear as to how to design an effective behavioral intervention using mobile technologies.  Thus, we need to understand how to utilize mobile phones effectively in order to develop innovative outreach and intervention strategies aimed at promoting healthy lifestyles or managing chronic illnesses. Fortunately, we have had the opportunity to conduct three mobile health (mHealth) clinical trials involving behavioral interventions to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. The purposes of this paper are to describe new insights from these mHealth clinical trials and how to apply mobile technologies to behavioral interventions in a diverse sample of sedentary adults. Methods and Discussions: In our mHealth trails, the mobile phone has been used as a means of delivering behavioral interventions, setting short and long-term goals, providing a self-monitoring tool (e.g. diary), giving real-time feedback, social support, and reminders, and capturing real-time data in a total of 165 sedentary adults (age 26 to 70 years). In this presentation, short and long-term adherence over a 9-month period in using these mobile phone functions will be discussed. We will also describe adherence rates in relation to older age, no mobile phone use prior to the trial enrollment, and low health literacy after controlling for potential confounding factors. Specific considerations for designing mobile health behavioral interventions will be highlighted. Implications: A systematic analyses of these extensive clinical trial datasets can move nursing science forward. With the rapid pace of mobile technological development, clinical trials with innovative approaches will help in the design of more effective behavioral interventions for mHealth. Funding sources: This paper was supported by NIH/NCRR NINR K23NR011454 and by NHLBI 5RO1HL104147.en_GB
dc.subjectNursing researchen_GB
dc.subjectBehavioral interventionsen_GB
dc.subjectMobile technologiesen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T11:59:42Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T11:59:42Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T11:59:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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