2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211517
Type:
Research Study
Title:
KOREAN IMMIGRANT COUPLES' PERINATAL HEALTH ISSUES: CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS
Abstract:
The rapid growth of culturally diverse populations brings special challenges to health care providers in the United States (U.S.). Childbirth, one of the most important life events in a family, is largely influenced and predetermined by the culture in which the birthing parents and their family originate. In each culture, health practices related to childbirth are uniquely ritualized based on traditional health belief system and empowered by support from family members. Experiencing childbirth in different sociocultural context can be intensively challenging for immigrant couples who oftentimes have limited support system in host country. In order to promote perinatal health outcomes, health care providers in obstetrical care settings are in a vital position to provide more culturally congruent quality health care to immigrant couples. To do so, they need to better understand multi-dimensional perinatal health issues experienced by the targeted immigrant couples. The purpose of this focused ethnographic study was to describe Korean immigrant couples’ perceived health issues while they experienced childbirth and perinatal care in the U.S. A purposive sample of 16 Korean immigrant couples was recruited from the State of Washington. In-depth interviews with participating couples were conducted in the Korean language within six months of their postpartum. Each couple was asked to verbally respond to semi-structured, open-ended interview questions developed to obtain data corresponding to the aim of this study. Leininger and McFarland’s four phases of ethnographic analysis were used to analyze the interview data. The nature of dyad structure in analyzing couple interview data was thoughtfully considered in order to interpret the data as each couple’s shared experience. Additional phone interviews were arranged to clarify unclear content during the data analysis process. The researcher’s observations and her field notes were supplemented to the interpretation of the interview data. The findings in this study revealed seven main themes as critical perinatal health issues experienced by participating Korean immigrant couples. Those were the issues related to: (1) confusion from unfamiliar health care delivery system, (2) culturally embedded expectations for perinatal health care, (3) difficulty in obtaining health care information, (4) difficulty in communication with health care providers, (5) conflicts between Western biomedicine and the practice of Sanhujori (Korean traditional postpartum health practices), (6) psychological hardship due to the lack of support system, and (7) the prevalent use of traditional health remedies during childbirth period in the U.S. Given the nature of the qualitative research method, the transferability of the findings to all Korean or other Asian immigrant couples needs to be further examined in future research. Despite of the limitation, findings in this study suggest several important implications for nursing practice. Those include the need for developing a culturally congruent perinatal assessment tool, developing culturally tailored perinatal intervention programs, integrating immigrant husbands’ health needs into perinatal care plan, and identifying any increased health risks associated with inappropriate cultural health practices. The findings in this study would also serve as an important knowledge base to design and evaluate the effectiveness of those suggested culturally tailored intervention programs.
Keywords:
Childbirth; Health practices; Diverse cultural populations
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5350
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleKOREAN IMMIGRANT COUPLES' PERINATAL HEALTH ISSUES: CLINICAL IMPLICATIONSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211517-
dc.description.abstractThe rapid growth of culturally diverse populations brings special challenges to health care providers in the United States (U.S.). Childbirth, one of the most important life events in a family, is largely influenced and predetermined by the culture in which the birthing parents and their family originate. In each culture, health practices related to childbirth are uniquely ritualized based on traditional health belief system and empowered by support from family members. Experiencing childbirth in different sociocultural context can be intensively challenging for immigrant couples who oftentimes have limited support system in host country. In order to promote perinatal health outcomes, health care providers in obstetrical care settings are in a vital position to provide more culturally congruent quality health care to immigrant couples. To do so, they need to better understand multi-dimensional perinatal health issues experienced by the targeted immigrant couples. The purpose of this focused ethnographic study was to describe Korean immigrant couples’ perceived health issues while they experienced childbirth and perinatal care in the U.S. A purposive sample of 16 Korean immigrant couples was recruited from the State of Washington. In-depth interviews with participating couples were conducted in the Korean language within six months of their postpartum. Each couple was asked to verbally respond to semi-structured, open-ended interview questions developed to obtain data corresponding to the aim of this study. Leininger and McFarland’s four phases of ethnographic analysis were used to analyze the interview data. The nature of dyad structure in analyzing couple interview data was thoughtfully considered in order to interpret the data as each couple’s shared experience. Additional phone interviews were arranged to clarify unclear content during the data analysis process. The researcher’s observations and her field notes were supplemented to the interpretation of the interview data. The findings in this study revealed seven main themes as critical perinatal health issues experienced by participating Korean immigrant couples. Those were the issues related to: (1) confusion from unfamiliar health care delivery system, (2) culturally embedded expectations for perinatal health care, (3) difficulty in obtaining health care information, (4) difficulty in communication with health care providers, (5) conflicts between Western biomedicine and the practice of Sanhujori (Korean traditional postpartum health practices), (6) psychological hardship due to the lack of support system, and (7) the prevalent use of traditional health remedies during childbirth period in the U.S. Given the nature of the qualitative research method, the transferability of the findings to all Korean or other Asian immigrant couples needs to be further examined in future research. Despite of the limitation, findings in this study suggest several important implications for nursing practice. Those include the need for developing a culturally congruent perinatal assessment tool, developing culturally tailored perinatal intervention programs, integrating immigrant husbands’ health needs into perinatal care plan, and identifying any increased health risks associated with inappropriate cultural health practices. The findings in this study would also serve as an important knowledge base to design and evaluate the effectiveness of those suggested culturally tailored intervention programs.en_GB
dc.subjectChildbirthen_GB
dc.subjectHealth practicesen_GB
dc.subjectDiverse cultural populationsen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T11:59:46Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T11:59:46Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T11:59:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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