FEASIBILITY OF AN AFTER SCHOOL PHYSICAL ACTIVITY PROGRAM IN A RURAL LATINO COMMUNITY

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211519
Type:
Research Study
Title:
FEASIBILITY OF AN AFTER SCHOOL PHYSICAL ACTIVITY PROGRAM IN A RURAL LATINO COMMUNITY
Abstract:
Purpose: To assess the feasibility of an after school program designed to increase physical activity and reduce risk behaviors in middle school youth in a rural and predominantly Latino community.  Background: During the middle school years physical activity declines precipitously and risk behaviors, such as substance use rise. Latino youth are disproportionately inactive, with accompanying unhealthy weight gain, and more likely engage in other risk behaviors. In response to a community concern and given the evidence of the synergy among these behaviors, we set out to assess whether participation in an after school physical activity program had the potential to impact risk behaviors as well as increase physical activity and reduce unhealthy weight gain. Methods: Using a community-based participatory research approach (CBPR), we co-developed with a community advisory group an after school physical activity program, Go Active and co-designed and co-conducted the feasibility study.  During 2009-2010, we conducted three 8-week cycles of Go Active led by school nurses. We assessed feasibility (acceptability, practicality, and perceived benefits) through attendance, observation of classes using a protocol checklist, focus groups, and parent surveys. We measured physical activity with accelerometers, weight and risk behaviors with youth surveys. Results: The program had overwhelming community acceptance, support and commitment. Parents reported that the program provided a safe place for their children to be active and that their children expressed excitement about the class. Participants described Go Active as fun and enjoyable and wanted it to continue and to be expanded to include summer. Go Active youth experienced peer bonding and relatedness; in focus groups participants stated, “It gives me a place to belong” and “I like the communication and interacting with others.”  The overall retention rate was 70%, with attendance increasing with each cycle; 54%, 64%, and 81% in successive cycles attending over half of the classes. We enrolled and retained obese and overweight youth and youth already engaging in risk behaviors and they fully engaged in Go Active. There was no significant overall pre-post change in accelerometer-measured physical activity and risk behaviors; however, we would expect to see a decline in moderate-vigorous physical activity and a rise in risk behaviors over this timeframe in this age group. Students in Go Active for 2 cycles lost 1- 4% of their initial body weight and decreased their average daily time watching television by 60-90 minutes (p= .048). Implications: This physical activity program is feasible and testing the effectiveness in a large trial is warranted.
Keywords:
Latino communities; Physical activity; Afer school programs
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5351
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleFEASIBILITY OF AN AFTER SCHOOL PHYSICAL ACTIVITY PROGRAM IN A RURAL LATINO COMMUNITYen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211519-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To assess the feasibility of an after school program designed to increase physical activity and reduce risk behaviors in middle school youth in a rural and predominantly Latino community.  Background: During the middle school years physical activity declines precipitously and risk behaviors, such as substance use rise. Latino youth are disproportionately inactive, with accompanying unhealthy weight gain, and more likely engage in other risk behaviors. In response to a community concern and given the evidence of the synergy among these behaviors, we set out to assess whether participation in an after school physical activity program had the potential to impact risk behaviors as well as increase physical activity and reduce unhealthy weight gain. Methods: Using a community-based participatory research approach (CBPR), we co-developed with a community advisory group an after school physical activity program, Go Active and co-designed and co-conducted the feasibility study.  During 2009-2010, we conducted three 8-week cycles of Go Active led by school nurses. We assessed feasibility (acceptability, practicality, and perceived benefits) through attendance, observation of classes using a protocol checklist, focus groups, and parent surveys. We measured physical activity with accelerometers, weight and risk behaviors with youth surveys. Results: The program had overwhelming community acceptance, support and commitment. Parents reported that the program provided a safe place for their children to be active and that their children expressed excitement about the class. Participants described Go Active as fun and enjoyable and wanted it to continue and to be expanded to include summer. Go Active youth experienced peer bonding and relatedness; in focus groups participants stated, “It gives me a place to belong” and “I like the communication and interacting with others.”  The overall retention rate was 70%, with attendance increasing with each cycle; 54%, 64%, and 81% in successive cycles attending over half of the classes. We enrolled and retained obese and overweight youth and youth already engaging in risk behaviors and they fully engaged in Go Active. There was no significant overall pre-post change in accelerometer-measured physical activity and risk behaviors; however, we would expect to see a decline in moderate-vigorous physical activity and a rise in risk behaviors over this timeframe in this age group. Students in Go Active for 2 cycles lost 1- 4% of their initial body weight and decreased their average daily time watching television by 60-90 minutes (p= .048). Implications: This physical activity program is feasible and testing the effectiveness in a large trial is warranted.en_GB
dc.subjectLatino communitiesen_GB
dc.subjectPhysical activityen_GB
dc.subjectAfer school programsen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T11:59:52Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T11:59:52Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T11:59:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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