2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211520
Type:
Research Study
Title:
A STUDY OF NEW GRADUATE NURSES' TRANSITION TO PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE
Abstract:
Introduction: The gap between the student nurses’ experience, the anticipation of the role of a registered nurse (RN) and the reality of the RN role in an acute care setting has long been recognized.  Many new graduate nurses do not survive the first years of their employment as an RN, and the turnover has been estimated to be as high as 30% among new graduate nurses.  The transition from student nurse to RN can be a very stressful time as the new graduate nurse learns to manage larger numbers of patients with higher levels of acuity, to “fit in” to an already existing unit culture, and to interact with highly experienced professionals from multiple disciplines. After three decades of discussing the situation, the problem still exists. Purpose: The purpose of this article is to disseminate the findings of a study that explored new graduate nurses’ perceptions of: 1) role stress (RS); 2) caring efficacy (EC); 3) evidence based practice (EBP); 4) organizational commitment (OC); and 5) job satisfaction. Significance: This study is significant because it is critical to assist each nurse with his/her transition from student to professional nurse, to enhance their satisfaction with the role and commitment to the organization, to enhance the retention of a critical human resource, and most importantly, to ensure safe, efficient patient care. Conceptual Framework: The Benner conceptual model of  Novice to Expert theory (Benner, 1984) and the Dreyfus Model of Skill Acquisition (Benner, 2004), and the O’Rourke Professional Role Development model (O'Rourke, 2003) were used to guide the study. Methods: The study employed an exploratory, cross-sectional quantitative design with a convenience non-probability sample (n = 41) of new graduate nurses who had worked at the organization for less than two years. Approvals to conduct the study were received from the IRBs at (blinded). Study variables (RS, CE, EBP, OC and JS) were measured using previously published scales with demonstrated psychometric properties. Results: The most important findings were the significant relationships seen between role stress and job satisfaction (r = -.36, p = .05) and affective commitment and job satisfaction (r = -.51, p = .01). It was also significant to note the strong correlation between caring efficacy and the evidence-based practice total scale (r = .63, p = .01) and the subscale of EBP – Skills/Knowledge (r = .63, p = .01). More moderate and significant relationships were seen between caring efficacy and EBP-Practice (r = .34, p = .05) and EBP – Attitude (r = .38, p = .05). These findings were significant since this is the first report of the significant relationship between caring efficacy and EBP-knowledge and skills. Implications: Since caring efficacy pertains to the nurses’ confidence that they can effectively care for patients and accomplish patient care goals, the findings of this study support the need for new residency programs that emphasize EBP to achieve higher levels of caring efficacy and to ensure affective commitment and job satisfaction.
Keywords:
Registerd nurse; Acute care settings; Student transition
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5353
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleA STUDY OF NEW GRADUATE NURSES' TRANSITION TO PROFESSIONAL PRACTICEen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211520-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: The gap between the student nurses’ experience, the anticipation of the role of a registered nurse (RN) and the reality of the RN role in an acute care setting has long been recognized.  Many new graduate nurses do not survive the first years of their employment as an RN, and the turnover has been estimated to be as high as 30% among new graduate nurses.  The transition from student nurse to RN can be a very stressful time as the new graduate nurse learns to manage larger numbers of patients with higher levels of acuity, to “fit in” to an already existing unit culture, and to interact with highly experienced professionals from multiple disciplines. After three decades of discussing the situation, the problem still exists. Purpose: The purpose of this article is to disseminate the findings of a study that explored new graduate nurses’ perceptions of: 1) role stress (RS); 2) caring efficacy (EC); 3) evidence based practice (EBP); 4) organizational commitment (OC); and 5) job satisfaction. Significance: This study is significant because it is critical to assist each nurse with his/her transition from student to professional nurse, to enhance their satisfaction with the role and commitment to the organization, to enhance the retention of a critical human resource, and most importantly, to ensure safe, efficient patient care. Conceptual Framework: The Benner conceptual model of  Novice to Expert theory (Benner, 1984) and the Dreyfus Model of Skill Acquisition (Benner, 2004), and the O’Rourke Professional Role Development model (O'Rourke, 2003) were used to guide the study. Methods: The study employed an exploratory, cross-sectional quantitative design with a convenience non-probability sample (n = 41) of new graduate nurses who had worked at the organization for less than two years. Approvals to conduct the study were received from the IRBs at (blinded). Study variables (RS, CE, EBP, OC and JS) were measured using previously published scales with demonstrated psychometric properties. Results: The most important findings were the significant relationships seen between role stress and job satisfaction (r = -.36, p = .05) and affective commitment and job satisfaction (r = -.51, p = .01). It was also significant to note the strong correlation between caring efficacy and the evidence-based practice total scale (r = .63, p = .01) and the subscale of EBP – Skills/Knowledge (r = .63, p = .01). More moderate and significant relationships were seen between caring efficacy and EBP-Practice (r = .34, p = .05) and EBP – Attitude (r = .38, p = .05). These findings were significant since this is the first report of the significant relationship between caring efficacy and EBP-knowledge and skills. Implications: Since caring efficacy pertains to the nurses’ confidence that they can effectively care for patients and accomplish patient care goals, the findings of this study support the need for new residency programs that emphasize EBP to achieve higher levels of caring efficacy and to ensure affective commitment and job satisfaction.en_GB
dc.subjectRegisterd nurseen_GB
dc.subjectAcute care settingsen_GB
dc.subjectStudent transitionen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T11:59:56Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T11:59:56Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T11:59:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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