EFFECTS OF COFACTORS ON POSTOPERATIVE RECOVERY IN OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP APNEA PATIENTS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211521
Type:
Research Study
Title:
EFFECTS OF COFACTORS ON POSTOPERATIVE RECOVERY IN OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP APNEA PATIENTS
Abstract:
Purpose/Aim: To determine if there is a difference in post operative recovery times between Obstructive Sleep Apnea patients with cofactors (HTN, Diabetes, Cardiovascular Disease) and Obstructive Sleep Apnea without cofactors. Significance/Background:  Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) is the most common disturbance during sleep affecting 2-26% of the general population. The occurrence of moderate to severe OSA is estimated to be 11.4% in men and 4.7% in women.  OSA is caused by repetitive partial or complete obstruction of the upper airway with apnea periods during sleep lasting greater than 10 seconds. OSA is a prevalent problem in western society, but is frequently undiagnosed due to lack of awareness or knowledge of this disorder.  This patient population presents a unique challenge during the peri-operative period due to increased risk for several complications. Of particular interest to the Nurse Anesthetist, are the respiratory complications that can result in delayed emergence from anesthesia, delayed post operative recovery, increased apneic episodes, hypoxemia, and death in this patient population. Examining duration of recovery periods between these two groups will help to determine if patients with OSA and additional cofactors of hypertension, cardiovascular disease and diabetes can benefit from a longer post operative monitoring or change in Anesthetic management. Design:  An experimental design to include a non- randomized convenience sample with two groups including males and females 18 to 65 years old.  Comparisons will be made between subjects on duration of postoperative recovery times and other discharge criteria with patients identified as having mild, moderate to severe OSA or no OSA utilizing the STOP-BANG tool. Methods: Patients undergoing elective abdominal surgery and consented for general anesthesia at a Military Treatment Facility (MTF) will be identified and asked to participate in the study.  OSA status will be determined based upon Sleep Studies, and responses to the eight questions STOP-BANG tool.  Data will be obtained in the Post Anesthesia Care Unit. Total recovery times will be obtained. Additional information will come from occurrence of pre-existing disease processes, Aldrete Scores, apneic episodes, pulse oximetry measurements, and use of continuous positive airway pressure devices. Findings: Multivariate Regression Testing will be incorporated to compare the effects of cofactors on postoperative recovery times of sleep apnea patients. A statistical Ancova analysis will evaluate individual cofactors and OSA postoperative recovery times. Mann-Whitney U analysis will be utilized to compare Aldrete scores, apneic episodes, pulse oximetry measurements, and number of positive airway pressure devices. T-test analysis will be performed on demographic information.  A p score of  < .05 will be considered significant. Implications for practice: If a significant difference in recovery time between groups is found, recommendations for appropriate postoperative monitoring and recovery measures could be implemented. Additionally, alternate forms of anesthesia can be studied to prevent extended postoperative periods and minimize complications.
Keywords:
Obstructive Sleep Apnea; Cofactors
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5357
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleEFFECTS OF COFACTORS ON POSTOPERATIVE RECOVERY IN OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP APNEA PATIENTSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211521-
dc.description.abstractPurpose/Aim: To determine if there is a difference in post operative recovery times between Obstructive Sleep Apnea patients with cofactors (HTN, Diabetes, Cardiovascular Disease) and Obstructive Sleep Apnea without cofactors. Significance/Background:  Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) is the most common disturbance during sleep affecting 2-26% of the general population. The occurrence of moderate to severe OSA is estimated to be 11.4% in men and 4.7% in women.  OSA is caused by repetitive partial or complete obstruction of the upper airway with apnea periods during sleep lasting greater than 10 seconds. OSA is a prevalent problem in western society, but is frequently undiagnosed due to lack of awareness or knowledge of this disorder.  This patient population presents a unique challenge during the peri-operative period due to increased risk for several complications. Of particular interest to the Nurse Anesthetist, are the respiratory complications that can result in delayed emergence from anesthesia, delayed post operative recovery, increased apneic episodes, hypoxemia, and death in this patient population. Examining duration of recovery periods between these two groups will help to determine if patients with OSA and additional cofactors of hypertension, cardiovascular disease and diabetes can benefit from a longer post operative monitoring or change in Anesthetic management. Design:  An experimental design to include a non- randomized convenience sample with two groups including males and females 18 to 65 years old.  Comparisons will be made between subjects on duration of postoperative recovery times and other discharge criteria with patients identified as having mild, moderate to severe OSA or no OSA utilizing the STOP-BANG tool. Methods: Patients undergoing elective abdominal surgery and consented for general anesthesia at a Military Treatment Facility (MTF) will be identified and asked to participate in the study.  OSA status will be determined based upon Sleep Studies, and responses to the eight questions STOP-BANG tool.  Data will be obtained in the Post Anesthesia Care Unit. Total recovery times will be obtained. Additional information will come from occurrence of pre-existing disease processes, Aldrete Scores, apneic episodes, pulse oximetry measurements, and use of continuous positive airway pressure devices. Findings: Multivariate Regression Testing will be incorporated to compare the effects of cofactors on postoperative recovery times of sleep apnea patients. A statistical Ancova analysis will evaluate individual cofactors and OSA postoperative recovery times. Mann-Whitney U analysis will be utilized to compare Aldrete scores, apneic episodes, pulse oximetry measurements, and number of positive airway pressure devices. T-test analysis will be performed on demographic information.  A p score of  < .05 will be considered significant. Implications for practice: If a significant difference in recovery time between groups is found, recommendations for appropriate postoperative monitoring and recovery measures could be implemented. Additionally, alternate forms of anesthesia can be studied to prevent extended postoperative periods and minimize complications.en_GB
dc.subjectObstructive Sleep Apneaen_GB
dc.subjectCofactorsen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T11:59:59Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T11:59:59Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T11:59:59Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.