DIFFERENCES IN METHODS USED TO ENHANCE NURSES KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDES, AND PRACTICE OF EBP

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211523
Type:
Research Study
Title:
DIFFERENCES IN METHODS USED TO ENHANCE NURSES KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDES, AND PRACTICE OF EBP
Abstract:
Introduction: Evidence-based practice (EBP) has been cited by both the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) and the Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (TJC) as a critical step in improving healthcare quality. EBP is considered to be a critical element in ensuring optimal outcomes for patients and creating professional practice environments (PPE) which have been associated with greater job satisfaction among nurses and enhanced collaboration among professional providers. While nursing literature is replete with articles assailing the benefits of EBP, many nurses do not have adequate knowledge, time or skills to research specific clinical or managerial issues nor the knowledge as to accessing or applying new findings to practice. An evidence-based curriculum based on adult learning theory has been correlated with improved skills and behaviors in EBP among nursing and medical students. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to test the effectiveness of a computer-based self-administered education module (CBL) as compared to the in-class presentation of the same education module (Class) on nurses’ knowledge, attitudes, and practice of EBP. Significance: This study was significant because to understand and provide EBP, all nurses must have not only the foundational knowledge of basic EBP skills, but also demonstrate an attitude which embraces its’ implementation and application. Conceptual Framework: Knowles’ Adult Learning Theory, Everett Rogers’ Diffusion of Innovation theory, and the Promoting Action in Research Integration in Health Services (PARIHS) framework (Kitson & Rycroft-Malone, 1998) were used to guide the study. Methods: The study design used a randomized controlled methodology to test differences in the effect of two educational delivery methods planned to improve nurses’ knowledge, attitudes and practice of EBP.  After IRB approval from (blinded), nurses working on all patient care units at three hospitals located one metropolitan campus were assigned to a group based on the randomization of their entire unit to one of the following groups: control (n = 130), computer based learning (CBL; n = 192) or class ( n = 274). The nurses in all three groups took a pre-test consisting of a short demographic survey, the EBPQ and subscales with known psychometric properties; and a self-developed 12 item multiple choice content knowledge exam. After the educational intervention, the subjects in the CBL and Class groups took the post-test for the EBPQ and content knowledge test. Results: There were no significant differences noted among the groups on the pre-test, and there was no significant difference in knowledge gained as noted on the pre-test to post-test between CBL and class learning. Implications: Since CBL is less costly and more accessible than formal class presentations, these findings indicate that CBL is an appropriate methodology for teaching EBP to nurses. There was a significant improvement on EBPQ practice sub-scale from pre-test to post-test for both the CBL and Class groups indicating that the learning modules made a difference in the EBP practice.
Keywords:
Evidence based practice; EBP
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5360
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleDIFFERENCES IN METHODS USED TO ENHANCE NURSES KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDES, AND PRACTICE OF EBPen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211523-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Evidence-based practice (EBP) has been cited by both the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) and the Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (TJC) as a critical step in improving healthcare quality. EBP is considered to be a critical element in ensuring optimal outcomes for patients and creating professional practice environments (PPE) which have been associated with greater job satisfaction among nurses and enhanced collaboration among professional providers. While nursing literature is replete with articles assailing the benefits of EBP, many nurses do not have adequate knowledge, time or skills to research specific clinical or managerial issues nor the knowledge as to accessing or applying new findings to practice. An evidence-based curriculum based on adult learning theory has been correlated with improved skills and behaviors in EBP among nursing and medical students. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to test the effectiveness of a computer-based self-administered education module (CBL) as compared to the in-class presentation of the same education module (Class) on nurses’ knowledge, attitudes, and practice of EBP. Significance: This study was significant because to understand and provide EBP, all nurses must have not only the foundational knowledge of basic EBP skills, but also demonstrate an attitude which embraces its’ implementation and application. Conceptual Framework: Knowles’ Adult Learning Theory, Everett Rogers’ Diffusion of Innovation theory, and the Promoting Action in Research Integration in Health Services (PARIHS) framework (Kitson & Rycroft-Malone, 1998) were used to guide the study. Methods: The study design used a randomized controlled methodology to test differences in the effect of two educational delivery methods planned to improve nurses’ knowledge, attitudes and practice of EBP.  After IRB approval from (blinded), nurses working on all patient care units at three hospitals located one metropolitan campus were assigned to a group based on the randomization of their entire unit to one of the following groups: control (n = 130), computer based learning (CBL; n = 192) or class ( n = 274). The nurses in all three groups took a pre-test consisting of a short demographic survey, the EBPQ and subscales with known psychometric properties; and a self-developed 12 item multiple choice content knowledge exam. After the educational intervention, the subjects in the CBL and Class groups took the post-test for the EBPQ and content knowledge test. Results: There were no significant differences noted among the groups on the pre-test, and there was no significant difference in knowledge gained as noted on the pre-test to post-test between CBL and class learning. Implications: Since CBL is less costly and more accessible than formal class presentations, these findings indicate that CBL is an appropriate methodology for teaching EBP to nurses. There was a significant improvement on EBPQ practice sub-scale from pre-test to post-test for both the CBL and Class groups indicating that the learning modules made a difference in the EBP practice.en_GB
dc.subjectEvidence based practiceen_GB
dc.subjectEBPen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:00:07Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:00:07Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:00:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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