2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211526
Type:
Research Study
Title:
KNOWLEDGE OF RISK FACTORS AND GENE TRANSMISSION AMONG WOMEN AT RISK FOR HBOC
Abstract:
Background: Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer (HBOC) is a term used to describe genetic susceptibility to breast and/or ovarian cancer. Most HBOC cases are attributed to BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes (BRCA1/1).  Once a case of HBOC is identified, the risk of finding the same mutation extends to family members.   Aims: This study examined whether HBOC family members can identify a) their own risk factors and b) how the BRCA1/1 genes are transmitted from generation to generation.  Methods: The sample consisted of 172 women who had greater than 10% chance of carrying an HBOC-predisposing genetic mutation but had NOT undergone genetic testing.  This study is part of the “Decisions in Families Project.” This quantitative, cross-sectional study examined frequencies of correct responses to a) a 19-item Risk Factor Knowledge Index, which assesses knowledge of breast and ovarian cancer risk factors and b) a 17-item instrument assessing knowledge of intergenerational transmission of the BRCA1/2 genes.   Both scales have been previously validated.  Results: The majority of items on the Risk Factor Knowledge Index were correctly identified by more than 50% of the respondents.  Nearly 95% of the sample understood that most cases of breast cancer are not due to heredity.  Two of the 17 items measuring knowledge of intergenerational transmission of the BRCA1/2 genes were correctly identified by the majority of participants: respondents understood that inherited and non-inherited gene mutations can cause cancer and that genetic testing can predict risk of developing cancer.  Approximately 50% did not know that men can pass on a BRCA1/2 mutation to their children and that BRCA1/2 genes are associated with both breast and ovarian cancer.  Similarly, 50% did not know family history indicators of a mutation-harboring family.  Fewer than 35% of women understood the numeric probabilities of developing HBOC and of passing on a BRCA1/2 mutation to offspring.  Implications: Interventions are needed to educate women at high risk for HBOC about risk factors that indicate a mutation-harboring family, and the intergenerational transmission of the BRCA1/2 genes.  Health care providers must identify appropriate strategies for disseminating this information to high risk women.   Nurses should incorporate cancer risk assessment into routine clinical practice and use an extended family history to identify higher risk women and advocate for their appropriate care.
Keywords:
Hereditary breast ovarian cancer; HBOC; Genetics
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5363
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleKNOWLEDGE OF RISK FACTORS AND GENE TRANSMISSION AMONG WOMEN AT RISK FOR HBOCen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211526-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer (HBOC) is a term used to describe genetic susceptibility to breast and/or ovarian cancer. Most HBOC cases are attributed to BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes (BRCA1/1).  Once a case of HBOC is identified, the risk of finding the same mutation extends to family members.   Aims: This study examined whether HBOC family members can identify a) their own risk factors and b) how the BRCA1/1 genes are transmitted from generation to generation.  Methods: The sample consisted of 172 women who had greater than 10% chance of carrying an HBOC-predisposing genetic mutation but had NOT undergone genetic testing.  This study is part of the “Decisions in Families Project.” This quantitative, cross-sectional study examined frequencies of correct responses to a) a 19-item Risk Factor Knowledge Index, which assesses knowledge of breast and ovarian cancer risk factors and b) a 17-item instrument assessing knowledge of intergenerational transmission of the BRCA1/2 genes.   Both scales have been previously validated.  Results: The majority of items on the Risk Factor Knowledge Index were correctly identified by more than 50% of the respondents.  Nearly 95% of the sample understood that most cases of breast cancer are not due to heredity.  Two of the 17 items measuring knowledge of intergenerational transmission of the BRCA1/2 genes were correctly identified by the majority of participants: respondents understood that inherited and non-inherited gene mutations can cause cancer and that genetic testing can predict risk of developing cancer.  Approximately 50% did not know that men can pass on a BRCA1/2 mutation to their children and that BRCA1/2 genes are associated with both breast and ovarian cancer.  Similarly, 50% did not know family history indicators of a mutation-harboring family.  Fewer than 35% of women understood the numeric probabilities of developing HBOC and of passing on a BRCA1/2 mutation to offspring.  Implications: Interventions are needed to educate women at high risk for HBOC about risk factors that indicate a mutation-harboring family, and the intergenerational transmission of the BRCA1/2 genes.  Health care providers must identify appropriate strategies for disseminating this information to high risk women.   Nurses should incorporate cancer risk assessment into routine clinical practice and use an extended family history to identify higher risk women and advocate for their appropriate care.en_GB
dc.subjectHereditary breast ovarian canceren_GB
dc.subjectHBOCen_GB
dc.subjectGeneticsen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:00:17Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:00:17Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:00:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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