2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211535
Type:
Research Study
Title:
ANATOMY OF A MEDICATION ERROR: NURSING STUDENTS' LIVED EXPERIENCES
Abstract:
Purpose/Aims: The purpose of this study is to uncover and describe the lived experiences of learning medication administration from the authentic voice of entry-level masters nursing students.  In doing so, this study (a) revealed the personal experiences associated with student medication administration learning activities, (b) captured the meanings students gave to their medication administration learning experiences, (c) uncovered the influence from the classroom, skills lab, and patient care learning environments on student learning experiences, and (d) disclosed the influence of current medication administration nursing practice on student learning experiences. Rationale: Medication errors are abounding and the complexity of medication administration creates an environment where health care providers are at risk for making errors.  This environment includes nursing students learning medication administration.  Coupled with a rigid, protocol-driven pedagogy, nursing students may be placed in a learning experience counterproductive to accuracy.  Previous studies have focused on causes and perceptions of medication errors looking for the delineation between safe and unsafe practice.  In doing so, past research may have narrowed the path of discovery needed to diminish medication errors. In addition, research regarding the lived experience of nursing students while they are learning medication administration is limited. Methods: An interpretive phenomenological approach was chosen to hear the nursing students’ genuine voices and to approach the reality of how nursing practice and practice wisdom is learned during medication administration. A purposive sample of 13 students attending an entry-level masters nursing program in Southern California were recruited on a voluntary basis. Individual interviews were conducted using an indirect discourse and documented by transcribed voice recordings and hand written jottings.  Initial and values coding was completed by hand and the QDA Miner software program. Jottings from the interview were converted to analytical, methodological, and personal memos as an ongoing process during data collection and analysis. The analytical method according to Benner was used to identify paradigm cases, themes, and exemplars. Results: Exploring these experiences offered insight into educational pedagogies that inhibited and those that promoted accuracy as well as perceived influences for medication errors.  A significant theme was the destructive learning aftermath, resulting from one student error, yet experienced by multiple student participants. The meaning of learning experiences, power relations, as well as, missing medication administration content was revealed. The theory of nursing lens distortion and the perfectibility model were used to further illustrate the experiences. Implications: This study gave voice to the nursing student participants, suggesting a connection between medication errors and the socio-political space and context within which they learn medication administration.  Further research to triangulate the faculty and staff nurse lived experiences during student learning is recommended.
Keywords:
Masters nursing students; Medication administration; Lived experience
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5394
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleANATOMY OF A MEDICATION ERROR: NURSING STUDENTS' LIVED EXPERIENCESen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211535-
dc.description.abstractPurpose/Aims: The purpose of this study is to uncover and describe the lived experiences of learning medication administration from the authentic voice of entry-level masters nursing students.  In doing so, this study (a) revealed the personal experiences associated with student medication administration learning activities, (b) captured the meanings students gave to their medication administration learning experiences, (c) uncovered the influence from the classroom, skills lab, and patient care learning environments on student learning experiences, and (d) disclosed the influence of current medication administration nursing practice on student learning experiences. Rationale: Medication errors are abounding and the complexity of medication administration creates an environment where health care providers are at risk for making errors.  This environment includes nursing students learning medication administration.  Coupled with a rigid, protocol-driven pedagogy, nursing students may be placed in a learning experience counterproductive to accuracy.  Previous studies have focused on causes and perceptions of medication errors looking for the delineation between safe and unsafe practice.  In doing so, past research may have narrowed the path of discovery needed to diminish medication errors. In addition, research regarding the lived experience of nursing students while they are learning medication administration is limited. Methods: An interpretive phenomenological approach was chosen to hear the nursing students’ genuine voices and to approach the reality of how nursing practice and practice wisdom is learned during medication administration. A purposive sample of 13 students attending an entry-level masters nursing program in Southern California were recruited on a voluntary basis. Individual interviews were conducted using an indirect discourse and documented by transcribed voice recordings and hand written jottings.  Initial and values coding was completed by hand and the QDA Miner software program. Jottings from the interview were converted to analytical, methodological, and personal memos as an ongoing process during data collection and analysis. The analytical method according to Benner was used to identify paradigm cases, themes, and exemplars. Results: Exploring these experiences offered insight into educational pedagogies that inhibited and those that promoted accuracy as well as perceived influences for medication errors.  A significant theme was the destructive learning aftermath, resulting from one student error, yet experienced by multiple student participants. The meaning of learning experiences, power relations, as well as, missing medication administration content was revealed. The theory of nursing lens distortion and the perfectibility model were used to further illustrate the experiences. Implications: This study gave voice to the nursing student participants, suggesting a connection between medication errors and the socio-political space and context within which they learn medication administration.  Further research to triangulate the faculty and staff nurse lived experiences during student learning is recommended.en_GB
dc.subjectMasters nursing studentsen_GB
dc.subjectMedication administrationen_GB
dc.subjectLived experienceen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:00:49Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:00:49Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:00:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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