2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211546
Type:
Research Study
Title:
BMI AND DEMOGRAPHIC VARIABLES IN PACIFIC ISLANDER ADULTS
Abstract:
Purpose/Aims: This study identified the proportion of our Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander (NHOPI) sample that is overweight or obese and explored relationships between body mass index (BMI) and demographic characteristics. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: Obesity is associated with a variety of health risks; thus, as obesity increases, so does the morbidity and mortality of related diseases. Most NHOPIs die from such illness, including diabetes and coronary or vascular diseases (Seniloli, 2005). To address NHOPI obesity, it is necessary to better understand the relationship between demographic variables and BMI within the NHOPI ethnic group. This information will help nurses identify subgroups most at risk for overweight/obesity. Methods: 365 NHOPI adults who were caregivers to at least one child participated. In Utah, we collected data at NHOPI events (n=156). In Hawaii, we collected data at a preschool and grocery stores (n=209). Our questionnaire included: (1) demographics, (2) Pfizer’s Newest Vital Sign Score Sheet, a food label literacy questionnaire, and (3) questions about food-serving practices and activity promotion for children. Following completion of the questionnaire, each participant was weighed and measured. Measurements were used to calculate BMIs. Results: According to the CDC’s BMI categories, 84.4% of our sample was overweight (BMI=25.0-29.9) or obese (BMI<30), including 17% who were morbidly obese (BMI<40). Participants’ BMIs ranged from 15.0 to 57.1. Participants in Utah had significantly higher BMIs than participants in Hawaii. This is consistent with previous findings that Native Hawaiians living on the mainland purchase and eat more food because it is less expensive than in Hawaii (Lassetter, 2011). In addition, participants who were less than 35 years of age had significantly higher BMIs than participants who were older than 35 years of age. This suggests NHOPIs’ obesity challenges are starting early and may indicate a trend toward increasing obesity as they age. We found no significant differences between BMI and gender, education, or income. Implications: NHOPIs’ risk for overweight and obesity may increase in locations where food is less expensive than in Hawaii or the Pacific Island nations. Nurses should be alert to this and educate NHOPIs accordingly. Additionally, obesity-related illnesses may be starting earlier among NHOPIs because participants who were less than 35 years of age had significantly higher BMIs. This indicates a heightened need for social marketing, education, and other interventions to help reduce obesity-related health risks. Future research should focus on effective, culturally appropriate interventions to decrease obesity. Funding: This study was funded by Brigham Young University grants, including a Graduate Mentoring Grant, the Elaine Dyer Award, and a Mentoring Environment Grant.
Keywords:
Native Hawaiian; Pacific Islander; Obesity; BMI
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5443
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleBMI AND DEMOGRAPHIC VARIABLES IN PACIFIC ISLANDER ADULTSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211546-
dc.description.abstractPurpose/Aims: This study identified the proportion of our Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander (NHOPI) sample that is overweight or obese and explored relationships between body mass index (BMI) and demographic characteristics. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: Obesity is associated with a variety of health risks; thus, as obesity increases, so does the morbidity and mortality of related diseases. Most NHOPIs die from such illness, including diabetes and coronary or vascular diseases (Seniloli, 2005). To address NHOPI obesity, it is necessary to better understand the relationship between demographic variables and BMI within the NHOPI ethnic group. This information will help nurses identify subgroups most at risk for overweight/obesity. Methods: 365 NHOPI adults who were caregivers to at least one child participated. In Utah, we collected data at NHOPI events (n=156). In Hawaii, we collected data at a preschool and grocery stores (n=209). Our questionnaire included: (1) demographics, (2) Pfizer’s Newest Vital Sign Score Sheet, a food label literacy questionnaire, and (3) questions about food-serving practices and activity promotion for children. Following completion of the questionnaire, each participant was weighed and measured. Measurements were used to calculate BMIs. Results: According to the CDC’s BMI categories, 84.4% of our sample was overweight (BMI=25.0-29.9) or obese (BMI<30), including 17% who were morbidly obese (BMI<40). Participants’ BMIs ranged from 15.0 to 57.1. Participants in Utah had significantly higher BMIs than participants in Hawaii. This is consistent with previous findings that Native Hawaiians living on the mainland purchase and eat more food because it is less expensive than in Hawaii (Lassetter, 2011). In addition, participants who were less than 35 years of age had significantly higher BMIs than participants who were older than 35 years of age. This suggests NHOPIs’ obesity challenges are starting early and may indicate a trend toward increasing obesity as they age. We found no significant differences between BMI and gender, education, or income. Implications: NHOPIs’ risk for overweight and obesity may increase in locations where food is less expensive than in Hawaii or the Pacific Island nations. Nurses should be alert to this and educate NHOPIs accordingly. Additionally, obesity-related illnesses may be starting earlier among NHOPIs because participants who were less than 35 years of age had significantly higher BMIs. This indicates a heightened need for social marketing, education, and other interventions to help reduce obesity-related health risks. Future research should focus on effective, culturally appropriate interventions to decrease obesity. Funding: This study was funded by Brigham Young University grants, including a Graduate Mentoring Grant, the Elaine Dyer Award, and a Mentoring Environment Grant.en_GB
dc.subjectNative Hawaiianen_GB
dc.subjectPacific Islanderen_GB
dc.subjectObesityen_GB
dc.subjectBMIen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:01:31Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:01:31Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:01:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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