2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211548
Type:
Research Study
Title:
INFLUENCE OF THE GABRA6 GENE on THE STRESS RESPONSE in VETERANS WITH PTSD
Abstract:
Purpose/Aims: The primary aim of this study was to test the feasibility of recruitment and data collection from veterans with PTSD enrolled in an inpatient Evaluation & Brief Treatment PTSD Unit (EBTPU).  A secondary aim was to explore relationships between GABRA6 gene variants (TT, CT, CC), diurnal cortisol cycles, total cortisol, and program outcome measures. Background: PTSD is a complex disorder involving alterations in neuroendocrine, neuropsychological, and brain structure severely impairing interpersonal relationships, work, and quality of life of affected individuals and their families.  Alterations in cortisol response to stress have been demonstrated in studies of individuals with PTSD and a link between HPA-axis dysregulation and aberrant memory consolidation may play a role in the reexperiencing of traumatic memories. A diurnal pattern is thought to indicate HPA-axis competence (the ability to maintain homeostasis). HPA-axis dysregulation is characterized by a disruption in the typical diurnal cycle. However, unexpected variations in cortisol cycles have been found in even healthy individuals.  The CC variant of the GABAAa6 receptor subunit (GABRA6) gene has been found to attenuate HPA-axis response to stress which may signal dysregulation. Methods: Veterans diagnosed with PTSD enrolled in a 3-week EBTPU program at a VA hospital located in southwest United States were recruited. Week 1 of the programs consists of evaluation and trust building, Week 2 consists of exposure treatment (trauma week), and Week 3 prepares individuals for discharge. Saliva samples were obtained over 2 days during each week.  Salivary cortisol was assessed by enzyme immunoassay. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was used for genotyping.  Program outcome measures included PTSD symptoms, depression, and global functioning. Results:  Of 27 subjects, 25 were genotyped. Three (12%) participants had the TT variant, 14 (56%) had the CT variant, and 8 (32%) demonstrated the CC variant. No significant relationship was found between genotype and cycle type nor was a relationship between cycle type and program outcomes found.  However, although on average, there was a statistically significant improvement on each of the outcome measures, lower total cortisol at week 2 (trauma week) was correlated with increased PTSD symptoms (r= -.43, p= .047) and with increased depression (r= -.53, p= .030). Implications: Feasibility was evaluated in terms of recruitment, self-collection of saliva by subjects, and laboratory analysis.  No major problems were encountered and the study design and methods appear feasible. Cortisol has been linked to the re-experiencing of aversive memories specifically; increased cortisol levels have been linked to reduction of reexperiencing symptoms in patients with PTSD.  A larger study using a control group is needed to examine variables defined in this study and may have implications for future intervention. Support: Emmons Research Funds, The University of Arizona, STTI Beta Mu Chapter Research Grant, Research Start-Up Funds, Arizona State University.
Keywords:
Post Traumatic Stress Disorder; PTSD; Veterans; Inpatient
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5451
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleINFLUENCE OF THE GABRA6 GENE on THE STRESS RESPONSE in VETERANS WITH PTSDen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211548-
dc.description.abstractPurpose/Aims: The primary aim of this study was to test the feasibility of recruitment and data collection from veterans with PTSD enrolled in an inpatient Evaluation & Brief Treatment PTSD Unit (EBTPU).  A secondary aim was to explore relationships between GABRA6 gene variants (TT, CT, CC), diurnal cortisol cycles, total cortisol, and program outcome measures. Background: PTSD is a complex disorder involving alterations in neuroendocrine, neuropsychological, and brain structure severely impairing interpersonal relationships, work, and quality of life of affected individuals and their families.  Alterations in cortisol response to stress have been demonstrated in studies of individuals with PTSD and a link between HPA-axis dysregulation and aberrant memory consolidation may play a role in the reexperiencing of traumatic memories. A diurnal pattern is thought to indicate HPA-axis competence (the ability to maintain homeostasis). HPA-axis dysregulation is characterized by a disruption in the typical diurnal cycle. However, unexpected variations in cortisol cycles have been found in even healthy individuals.  The CC variant of the GABAAa6 receptor subunit (GABRA6) gene has been found to attenuate HPA-axis response to stress which may signal dysregulation. Methods: Veterans diagnosed with PTSD enrolled in a 3-week EBTPU program at a VA hospital located in southwest United States were recruited. Week 1 of the programs consists of evaluation and trust building, Week 2 consists of exposure treatment (trauma week), and Week 3 prepares individuals for discharge. Saliva samples were obtained over 2 days during each week.  Salivary cortisol was assessed by enzyme immunoassay. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was used for genotyping.  Program outcome measures included PTSD symptoms, depression, and global functioning. Results:  Of 27 subjects, 25 were genotyped. Three (12%) participants had the TT variant, 14 (56%) had the CT variant, and 8 (32%) demonstrated the CC variant. No significant relationship was found between genotype and cycle type nor was a relationship between cycle type and program outcomes found.  However, although on average, there was a statistically significant improvement on each of the outcome measures, lower total cortisol at week 2 (trauma week) was correlated with increased PTSD symptoms (r= -.43, p= .047) and with increased depression (r= -.53, p= .030). Implications: Feasibility was evaluated in terms of recruitment, self-collection of saliva by subjects, and laboratory analysis.  No major problems were encountered and the study design and methods appear feasible. Cortisol has been linked to the re-experiencing of aversive memories specifically; increased cortisol levels have been linked to reduction of reexperiencing symptoms in patients with PTSD.  A larger study using a control group is needed to examine variables defined in this study and may have implications for future intervention. Support: Emmons Research Funds, The University of Arizona, STTI Beta Mu Chapter Research Grant, Research Start-Up Funds, Arizona State University.en_GB
dc.subjectPost Traumatic Stress Disorderen_GB
dc.subjectPTSDen_GB
dc.subjectVeteransen_GB
dc.subjectInpatienten_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:01:38Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:01:38Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:01:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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