2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211550
Type:
Research Study
Title:
Healing Touch Effect on Reduction of Anxiety of High Risk OB Patients
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine if a  complementary therapy, healing touch  decreases anxiety and/or improves patient satisfaction in antepartum patients. Rationale: Women on prolonged pregnancy-related bed rest are susceptible to high levels of physical, emotional, and economic hardship.  Studies have shown 15.9% of the parents-to-be were highly anxious and/or depressed during pregnancy, (Figueiredo, 2011).  Non-pharmacological interventions such as mind-body interventions may decrease anxiety in clinical situations, (Marc, 2011). Hospitalized high risk antepartum patients may be anxious and concerned about the uncertainty of their health and the well being of their unborn child, prompting feelings of powerlessness, isolation, separation anxiety, fear concerning the potential loss of pregnancy, and financial stress. Healing Touch (HT) is a complementary therapy based on the belief that our bodies are surrounded by a field of energy which has an indivisible relationship with the mind, body and spirit, per Janet Mentgen RN founder of HT. Once the body's energy is cleared and balanced, we have the innate capacity to heal ourselves ( Hutchison, 1999).  The goal of Healing Touch is to accelerate the recipient’s own healing process by restoring the harmony and balance in the energy system, thus affecting all levels of body, mind, and spirit through the use of the practitioner’s hands, intentionality, and a centered heart (Umbreit, 2000). Methods:  Using a randomized controlled design, we conducted a three intervention arm study of anxiety and satisfaction in antepartum patients Interventions included:   (1)  standard nursing care- control group ,  (2)  Healing Touch therapy, in which a trained practitioner performed modalities that facilitate a healthy, balanced energy field, including freeing bound energy by sweeping away the energy blocks with their hands. (3) and “caring presence” (CP), where spiritual care personnel help patients express their feelings or emotions, respecting any faith affiliation and personal values. The HT and CP groups received the intervention two times a week for 2 weeks.Depression and anxiety were measured by Edinburg and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory screening tools and a patient satisfaction survey. Physiological measures such as pulse, respirations, blood pressure were taken before and after interventions. Comments from the patients will also be included in analysis. Results: The study was conducted from September, 2009   to September, 2011. Approximately 15 patients were enrolled in each arm (HT, CP, and Traditional) of the study. Preliminary analysis has been conducted on the overall differences between pretest and posttest anxiety scores using paired t-tests. The caring presence group demonstrated a significant (p<0.05) difference in decreasing anxiety. The observations from the HT group, many patients appeared relaxed and calm, and many fell asleep and by the end of the therapy session.  Further analysis will assess differences within groups between interventions. Implications: This study applies the principles, processes and methodology of Healing Touch with the intent to reduce symptom distress associated with long term hospitalization in the high risk obstetrical patient population. Results indicate that addressing the psychosocial needs of the patient improve patient satisfaction and reduce anxiety.
Keywords:
Antepartum patients; Anxiety; Healing Touch therapy
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5458
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleHealing Touch Effect on Reduction of Anxiety of High Risk OB Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211550-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this study is to determine if a  complementary therapy, healing touch  decreases anxiety and/or improves patient satisfaction in antepartum patients. Rationale: Women on prolonged pregnancy-related bed rest are susceptible to high levels of physical, emotional, and economic hardship.  Studies have shown 15.9% of the parents-to-be were highly anxious and/or depressed during pregnancy, (Figueiredo, 2011).  Non-pharmacological interventions such as mind-body interventions may decrease anxiety in clinical situations, (Marc, 2011). Hospitalized high risk antepartum patients may be anxious and concerned about the uncertainty of their health and the well being of their unborn child, prompting feelings of powerlessness, isolation, separation anxiety, fear concerning the potential loss of pregnancy, and financial stress. Healing Touch (HT) is a complementary therapy based on the belief that our bodies are surrounded by a field of energy which has an indivisible relationship with the mind, body and spirit, per Janet Mentgen RN founder of HT. Once the body's energy is cleared and balanced, we have the innate capacity to heal ourselves ( Hutchison, 1999).  The goal of Healing Touch is to accelerate the recipient’s own healing process by restoring the harmony and balance in the energy system, thus affecting all levels of body, mind, and spirit through the use of the practitioner’s hands, intentionality, and a centered heart (Umbreit, 2000). Methods:  Using a randomized controlled design, we conducted a three intervention arm study of anxiety and satisfaction in antepartum patients Interventions included:   (1)  standard nursing care- control group ,  (2)  Healing Touch therapy, in which a trained practitioner performed modalities that facilitate a healthy, balanced energy field, including freeing bound energy by sweeping away the energy blocks with their hands. (3) and “caring presence” (CP), where spiritual care personnel help patients express their feelings or emotions, respecting any faith affiliation and personal values. The HT and CP groups received the intervention two times a week for 2 weeks.Depression and anxiety were measured by Edinburg and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory screening tools and a patient satisfaction survey. Physiological measures such as pulse, respirations, blood pressure were taken before and after interventions. Comments from the patients will also be included in analysis. Results: The study was conducted from September, 2009   to September, 2011. Approximately 15 patients were enrolled in each arm (HT, CP, and Traditional) of the study. Preliminary analysis has been conducted on the overall differences between pretest and posttest anxiety scores using paired t-tests. The caring presence group demonstrated a significant (p<0.05) difference in decreasing anxiety. The observations from the HT group, many patients appeared relaxed and calm, and many fell asleep and by the end of the therapy session.  Further analysis will assess differences within groups between interventions. Implications: This study applies the principles, processes and methodology of Healing Touch with the intent to reduce symptom distress associated with long term hospitalization in the high risk obstetrical patient population. Results indicate that addressing the psychosocial needs of the patient improve patient satisfaction and reduce anxiety.en_GB
dc.subjectAntepartum patientsen_GB
dc.subjectAnxietyen_GB
dc.subjectHealing Touch therapyen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:01:46Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:01:46Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:01:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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