LATINO/HISPANIC YOUNG MEN AND HEALTH BELIEFS, ACCULTURATION AND EMERGING ADULTHOOD

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211552
Type:
Research Study
Title:
LATINO/HISPANIC YOUNG MEN AND HEALTH BELIEFS, ACCULTURATION AND EMERGING ADULTHOOD
Abstract:
Purposes/Aims: The purpose of the study was to identify factors that influenced health promotion behaviors in Latino/Hispanic men’s health including their experiences and health concerns. The specific aims of the study were 1) explore and describe the influence of emerging adulthood and acculturation processes on the meaning of health for young Latino/Hispanic men, 2) identify the consequences of emerging adulthood and acculturation processes in terms of health beliefs and behaviors as perceived by young Latino/Hispanic men and 3) generate hypotheses that can be used to develop and test culturally appropriate measurement and intervention strategies to promote and improve the health of young Latino/Hispanic men. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: Limited educational and economic opportunity impacts their ability to obtain a job and health insurance. The lack of health insurance forces many young men to forgo health screening and treatment. Young men in general and Latino/Hispanic young men in particular are in many instances socialized into concealing their pain or injuries. Emerging adulthood is a developmental juncture when individuals are no longer adolescents but are not considered by themselves or their parents to be full adult (Arnett, 2000; 2004; Nelson, et al., 2007). In addition to the demands of love, work, developing a worldview and mature identity, emerging adulthood is also a period of instability during which relationships are fluid, that is, they are short term. Acculturation is a multi-dimensional process (Abraido-Lanza, Armbrister, Florez & Aguirre, 2006) that encompasses social cognition, cultural competence, social identity, social dominance and social stigma. The study used a modified ecological conceptual framework as a guide to understanding the experiences of young Latino/Hispanic men. Acculturation, emerging adulthood and health were the three key ecological variables used in the study. Methods: The study consisted of two data collection sessions. Session one consisted of a semi-structured individual interview and completion of a demographic questionnaire, two acculturation scales, a health promoting lifestyle scale, and visual analog scales for overall health perceptions and quality of life. Session two consisted of focus where young men were asked to clarify and amplify findings from session one. The participants were asked to elaborate on the key health promotion issues that impacted their day to day lives. The sample consisted of 16 Latino/Hispanic young men who were students at a Hispanic-serving university in the Southwestern United States. All were between the ages of 18 and 25. Results: The majority (56.3%) of the young men self-identified as Mexican and 18.8% self-identified as Mexican American ethnicity. Three-quarters of the sample (12/16) self-identified as heterosexual while 18.8% (3/16) self-identified as questioning. The qualitative results indicated that participants struggled with issues of relationships, work and love. Participants believed that any health promotion program must use the internet to deliver a culturally competent message. Implications: Any future work with young Latino/Hispanic men must take into consideration how ethnicity influences health promotion choices. In addition, any health promotion must engage the Latino/Hispanic family and community.
Keywords:
Latino male health; Hispanic male health; Health promotion behaviors
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5460
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleLATINO/HISPANIC YOUNG MEN AND HEALTH BELIEFS, ACCULTURATION AND EMERGING ADULTHOODen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211552-
dc.description.abstractPurposes/Aims: The purpose of the study was to identify factors that influenced health promotion behaviors in Latino/Hispanic men’s health including their experiences and health concerns. The specific aims of the study were 1) explore and describe the influence of emerging adulthood and acculturation processes on the meaning of health for young Latino/Hispanic men, 2) identify the consequences of emerging adulthood and acculturation processes in terms of health beliefs and behaviors as perceived by young Latino/Hispanic men and 3) generate hypotheses that can be used to develop and test culturally appropriate measurement and intervention strategies to promote and improve the health of young Latino/Hispanic men. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: Limited educational and economic opportunity impacts their ability to obtain a job and health insurance. The lack of health insurance forces many young men to forgo health screening and treatment. Young men in general and Latino/Hispanic young men in particular are in many instances socialized into concealing their pain or injuries. Emerging adulthood is a developmental juncture when individuals are no longer adolescents but are not considered by themselves or their parents to be full adult (Arnett, 2000; 2004; Nelson, et al., 2007). In addition to the demands of love, work, developing a worldview and mature identity, emerging adulthood is also a period of instability during which relationships are fluid, that is, they are short term. Acculturation is a multi-dimensional process (Abraido-Lanza, Armbrister, Florez & Aguirre, 2006) that encompasses social cognition, cultural competence, social identity, social dominance and social stigma. The study used a modified ecological conceptual framework as a guide to understanding the experiences of young Latino/Hispanic men. Acculturation, emerging adulthood and health were the three key ecological variables used in the study. Methods: The study consisted of two data collection sessions. Session one consisted of a semi-structured individual interview and completion of a demographic questionnaire, two acculturation scales, a health promoting lifestyle scale, and visual analog scales for overall health perceptions and quality of life. Session two consisted of focus where young men were asked to clarify and amplify findings from session one. The participants were asked to elaborate on the key health promotion issues that impacted their day to day lives. The sample consisted of 16 Latino/Hispanic young men who were students at a Hispanic-serving university in the Southwestern United States. All were between the ages of 18 and 25. Results: The majority (56.3%) of the young men self-identified as Mexican and 18.8% self-identified as Mexican American ethnicity. Three-quarters of the sample (12/16) self-identified as heterosexual while 18.8% (3/16) self-identified as questioning. The qualitative results indicated that participants struggled with issues of relationships, work and love. Participants believed that any health promotion program must use the internet to deliver a culturally competent message. Implications: Any future work with young Latino/Hispanic men must take into consideration how ethnicity influences health promotion choices. In addition, any health promotion must engage the Latino/Hispanic family and community.en_GB
dc.subjectLatino male healthen_GB
dc.subjectHispanic male healthen_GB
dc.subjectHealth promotion behaviorsen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:01:53Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:01:53Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:01:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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