THE EFFECT OF PROGRAM COMPONENTS AND LIFE DEMANDS ON DISSERTATION COMPLETION IN DNP ABDS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211553
Type:
Research Study
Title:
THE EFFECT OF PROGRAM COMPONENTS AND LIFE DEMANDS ON DISSERTATION COMPLETION IN DNP ABDS
Abstract:
Background: The fifth recommendation of The Future of Nursing (IOM, 2010) is to double the number of doctorally prepared nurses by 2020. Given a) the 2008 National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses (HRSA, 2010) estimate of 28,369 nurses with doctorates, 0.4% (13,140) in nursing and 0.5% (15,229) in other disciplines, b) the addition of over a 1000 nurses a year earning doctorates since 2008 (AACN, 2011), c) 277 current doctoral programs in nursing (124 PhD, 153 DNP, with more planned) with 11,645 students enrolled in 2010 (AACN, 2011), and d) presumably thousands more nurses enrolled in non-nursing doctoral programs, the recommendation of merely doubling the number of doctorally prepared nurses by 2020 underestimates the potential. Simple math would predict more than quadrupling the number of doctorally prepared nurses by 2020.  Rationale: Dissertation completion remains a major obstacle to doctoral degree completion. Cohen (2011) estimated that only between 20-50% of nursing doctoral students finish their degree with women and minorities having the longest trajectory to completion and any student working over two years on their dissertation likely to never finish. The average percentage of nursing doctoral students who complete their degree in six years for 52 nursing PhD programs ranked on PhDs.org is 51.8% (range 100-19%) (“Nursing Rankings” n.d. http://graduate-school.phds.org/rankings/nursing). There is little data on DNP progression and completion rates. Purpose: The purpose of this research was to assess the helpfulness of completion factors for students enrolled in an MSN-DNP program. Cohen (2011) reported that factors related to dissertation completion for DNP students included program components and life demands. Methods: A two part 25 item self-report survey consisting of 15 internal program components (PC) and 10 external life factors (LF) was distributed electronically using Qualtrecs software to 53 all-but-dissertation (ABD) DNP students. Comments were also solicited. Thirty seven students (70%) completed the survey. Participants ranked PC items as Very Helpful, Somewhat Helpful, Not Helpful, or Did Not Use. LF items were ranked as Very Helpful, Somewhat Helpful, Negatively Affected My Dissertation Progress, or Did Not Affect My Dissertation Process. Points were assigned per ranking and summed per item over all participants to comprise a final score. Results: The PC mean ranking score was 42.8 (SD=9.2, range=29, 24-53). Dissertation targeted assignments, guidelines, seminars, and online resources, along with Chair feedback received the highest scores. College and University resources and dissertation committee member feedback had the lowest. The LF mean ranking score was 28 (SD=21.6, range=60, -5-55). Technology resources and personal motivation received the highest scores. Finances, family obligations, health, and employment had the lowest. Many comments were submitted. Implications: The survey results supported the findings of Cohen that program supports are the most helpful, and that life demands are the least helpful and have the most negative affect on dissertation completion. All nursing doctoral programs need to create and evaluate program and student specific interventions to help ABDs to finish if the number of doctorally prepared nurses is to double by 2020.
Keywords:
Doctorally prepared nurses; Doctoral degree completion
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5461
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleTHE EFFECT OF PROGRAM COMPONENTS AND LIFE DEMANDS ON DISSERTATION COMPLETION IN DNP ABDSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211553-
dc.description.abstractBackground: The fifth recommendation of The Future of Nursing (IOM, 2010) is to double the number of doctorally prepared nurses by 2020. Given a) the 2008 National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses (HRSA, 2010) estimate of 28,369 nurses with doctorates, 0.4% (13,140) in nursing and 0.5% (15,229) in other disciplines, b) the addition of over a 1000 nurses a year earning doctorates since 2008 (AACN, 2011), c) 277 current doctoral programs in nursing (124 PhD, 153 DNP, with more planned) with 11,645 students enrolled in 2010 (AACN, 2011), and d) presumably thousands more nurses enrolled in non-nursing doctoral programs, the recommendation of merely doubling the number of doctorally prepared nurses by 2020 underestimates the potential. Simple math would predict more than quadrupling the number of doctorally prepared nurses by 2020.  Rationale: Dissertation completion remains a major obstacle to doctoral degree completion. Cohen (2011) estimated that only between 20-50% of nursing doctoral students finish their degree with women and minorities having the longest trajectory to completion and any student working over two years on their dissertation likely to never finish. The average percentage of nursing doctoral students who complete their degree in six years for 52 nursing PhD programs ranked on PhDs.org is 51.8% (range 100-19%) (“Nursing Rankings” n.d. http://graduate-school.phds.org/rankings/nursing). There is little data on DNP progression and completion rates. Purpose: The purpose of this research was to assess the helpfulness of completion factors for students enrolled in an MSN-DNP program. Cohen (2011) reported that factors related to dissertation completion for DNP students included program components and life demands. Methods: A two part 25 item self-report survey consisting of 15 internal program components (PC) and 10 external life factors (LF) was distributed electronically using Qualtrecs software to 53 all-but-dissertation (ABD) DNP students. Comments were also solicited. Thirty seven students (70%) completed the survey. Participants ranked PC items as Very Helpful, Somewhat Helpful, Not Helpful, or Did Not Use. LF items were ranked as Very Helpful, Somewhat Helpful, Negatively Affected My Dissertation Progress, or Did Not Affect My Dissertation Process. Points were assigned per ranking and summed per item over all participants to comprise a final score. Results: The PC mean ranking score was 42.8 (SD=9.2, range=29, 24-53). Dissertation targeted assignments, guidelines, seminars, and online resources, along with Chair feedback received the highest scores. College and University resources and dissertation committee member feedback had the lowest. The LF mean ranking score was 28 (SD=21.6, range=60, -5-55). Technology resources and personal motivation received the highest scores. Finances, family obligations, health, and employment had the lowest. Many comments were submitted. Implications: The survey results supported the findings of Cohen that program supports are the most helpful, and that life demands are the least helpful and have the most negative affect on dissertation completion. All nursing doctoral programs need to create and evaluate program and student specific interventions to help ABDs to finish if the number of doctorally prepared nurses is to double by 2020.en_GB
dc.subjectDoctorally prepared nursesen_GB
dc.subjectDoctoral degree completionen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:01:56Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:01:56Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:01:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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