2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211557
Type:
Research Study
Title:
SELF-DIRECTED LEARNING READINESS AND LEARNING STYLES in NURSING STUDENTS
Abstract:
Purpose: To explore the learning style and self-directed learning readiness of entering graduate (GS) and undergraduate (UG) nursing students at a major academic health center university. Aims:  Compare and contrast the survey scores of both student groups. The questions posed are 1) whether both cohorts have the attributes of Self Directed  learning (SDL)  and 2) is there evidence that students have the ability to be flexible in learning styles when approaching different subjects. Background:  An assumption in revising a curriculum based on the Advanced Practice Essentials (NONPF, 2011) or the AACN Bachelors’Essentials (2008) is that the students will have SDL attributes and be able to explore complex content from various perspectives. A long held belief is that under graduate students (UG) differ from undergraduates (UG) in these attributes.  Studies of the new generation (Millennials) recognize they are more technology savvy and approach problem solving differently than other generations (Hartman, Moskal & Dzuiuban, 2005). Methods: Using the nursing student validated Self-Directed Learning Readiness Scale (SDRLS)(Fisher, Tague, King, 2000) and the Index of Individual Learning Style questionnaire (ILS)(Felder & Solomon; 1993) , the entering cohorts of both levels of students taking their first pharmacology course were tested using de-identified data. Results: There were 154 participants (34 GS) with an equal distribution of men (17%) in each cohort.  Average age was 26-34 years (49.7%) with the range of 18-25 years representing 28.4% of the participants.  The high SDL scores earned by both cohorts were not significantly different.  Importantly, the English as Second Language students (n = 11) did not differ in SD scores either. Age and gender did impact ILS scores. Men showed a slightly stronger real life or “Sensing” learning preference. The older students in self-reported lesser scores on self-control than their younger counterparts!  When measured across the four subscales of the ILS, both cohorts repeatedly scored as having flexibility in use of multiple learning styles. Implications: Both undergraduate and graduate students have the required attributes of being able to focus on details, but also see the global picture; follow sequential protocols but  also vary interventions as needed; can both empathize with others but logically prioritize needs; and are able to process both verbal and visual cues. The assumptions of the past concerning the learning style difference between UG and GS should be questioned.  Curriculum revision can proceed because the high standards of both NOPF and AACN can be achieved by the entering classes of students. 
Keywords:
Nursing students; Learning styles
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5474
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleSELF-DIRECTED LEARNING READINESS AND LEARNING STYLES in NURSING STUDENTSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211557-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To explore the learning style and self-directed learning readiness of entering graduate (GS) and undergraduate (UG) nursing students at a major academic health center university. Aims:  Compare and contrast the survey scores of both student groups. The questions posed are 1) whether both cohorts have the attributes of Self Directed  learning (SDL)  and 2) is there evidence that students have the ability to be flexible in learning styles when approaching different subjects. Background:  An assumption in revising a curriculum based on the Advanced Practice Essentials (NONPF, 2011) or the AACN Bachelors’Essentials (2008) is that the students will have SDL attributes and be able to explore complex content from various perspectives. A long held belief is that under graduate students (UG) differ from undergraduates (UG) in these attributes.  Studies of the new generation (Millennials) recognize they are more technology savvy and approach problem solving differently than other generations (Hartman, Moskal & Dzuiuban, 2005). Methods: Using the nursing student validated Self-Directed Learning Readiness Scale (SDRLS)(Fisher, Tague, King, 2000) and the Index of Individual Learning Style questionnaire (ILS)(Felder & Solomon; 1993) , the entering cohorts of both levels of students taking their first pharmacology course were tested using de-identified data. Results: There were 154 participants (34 GS) with an equal distribution of men (17%) in each cohort.  Average age was 26-34 years (49.7%) with the range of 18-25 years representing 28.4% of the participants.  The high SDL scores earned by both cohorts were not significantly different.  Importantly, the English as Second Language students (n = 11) did not differ in SD scores either. Age and gender did impact ILS scores. Men showed a slightly stronger real life or “Sensing” learning preference. The older students in self-reported lesser scores on self-control than their younger counterparts!  When measured across the four subscales of the ILS, both cohorts repeatedly scored as having flexibility in use of multiple learning styles. Implications: Both undergraduate and graduate students have the required attributes of being able to focus on details, but also see the global picture; follow sequential protocols but  also vary interventions as needed; can both empathize with others but logically prioritize needs; and are able to process both verbal and visual cues. The assumptions of the past concerning the learning style difference between UG and GS should be questioned.  Curriculum revision can proceed because the high standards of both NOPF and AACN can be achieved by the entering classes of students. en_GB
dc.subjectNursing studentsen_GB
dc.subjectLearning stylesen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:02:10Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:02:10Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:02:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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