2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211558
Type:
Research Study
Title:
MY FAMILY MEDICAL HISTORY AND ME: FEASIBILITY RESULTS
Abstract:
Purpose/Aims: The purpose of this study is to examine the feasibility of a theory-based, nurse-delivered intervention aimed at increasing perceived cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk and intentions to engage in health-promoting behavior in asymptomatic young adults with a family history of CVD. The specific aim is to examine the feasibility of recruitment, study design adherence, study participants’ ability to gather family medical history information, and their willingness to provide blood samples for biological testing and genetic testing. Rationale/Background: It is known that a family history of CVD increases the risk of developing CVD. Research has definitively shown that the risk associated with a family history of CVD can be reduced though health-promoting behaviors. However, very little research has examined whether personalized risk information about a family history of CVD influences or changes health-related behavior. Furthermore, no published research has examined the use of personalized risk information in a young, asymptomatic, presumed healthy population. If the study is feasible, a larger study with a randomized control design will be conducted. Methods: The study utilizes a pre-post test design and all aspects of recruitment and the study designs are being examined. This includes the number of persons who were approached but declined, the numbers of individuals who refused to provide a blood sample for CVD biomarkers and/or genotyping, canceled/rescheduled appointments, and the drop-out rates at all junctures of the study design. Additionally, the average length of time to complete the measures (subject burden), the length of time for each session, and the completeness of all self-reported measures and family medical history questionnaires will be examined. Finally, data from seven open-ended questions will be used to assess the “helpfulness” of the intervention and to determine ways to improve the intervention, if needed. Results: Data collection is currently underway. Results will be available by the conference. Implications: The study will advance our knowledge about the willingness of healthy young adults to participant in family medical history focused studies, as well as the feasibility of obtaining complete and accurate family history information and blood for biomarkers and genetic testing from this population. An intervention that successfully increases perceived risk and intention to engage in health-promoting behaviors may reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with CVD.
Keywords:
Cardiovascular disease, perception of risk; Nurse delivered intervention
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5475
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleMY FAMILY MEDICAL HISTORY AND ME: FEASIBILITY RESULTSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211558-
dc.description.abstractPurpose/Aims: The purpose of this study is to examine the feasibility of a theory-based, nurse-delivered intervention aimed at increasing perceived cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk and intentions to engage in health-promoting behavior in asymptomatic young adults with a family history of CVD. The specific aim is to examine the feasibility of recruitment, study design adherence, study participants’ ability to gather family medical history information, and their willingness to provide blood samples for biological testing and genetic testing. Rationale/Background: It is known that a family history of CVD increases the risk of developing CVD. Research has definitively shown that the risk associated with a family history of CVD can be reduced though health-promoting behaviors. However, very little research has examined whether personalized risk information about a family history of CVD influences or changes health-related behavior. Furthermore, no published research has examined the use of personalized risk information in a young, asymptomatic, presumed healthy population. If the study is feasible, a larger study with a randomized control design will be conducted. Methods: The study utilizes a pre-post test design and all aspects of recruitment and the study designs are being examined. This includes the number of persons who were approached but declined, the numbers of individuals who refused to provide a blood sample for CVD biomarkers and/or genotyping, canceled/rescheduled appointments, and the drop-out rates at all junctures of the study design. Additionally, the average length of time to complete the measures (subject burden), the length of time for each session, and the completeness of all self-reported measures and family medical history questionnaires will be examined. Finally, data from seven open-ended questions will be used to assess the “helpfulness” of the intervention and to determine ways to improve the intervention, if needed. Results: Data collection is currently underway. Results will be available by the conference. Implications: The study will advance our knowledge about the willingness of healthy young adults to participant in family medical history focused studies, as well as the feasibility of obtaining complete and accurate family history information and blood for biomarkers and genetic testing from this population. An intervention that successfully increases perceived risk and intention to engage in health-promoting behaviors may reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with CVD.en_GB
dc.subjectCardiovascular disease, perception of risken_GB
dc.subjectNurse delivered interventionen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:02:13Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:02:13Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:02:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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