2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211559
Type:
Research Study
Title:
UNDERGRADUATE NURSING STUDENT
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore physical and mental health in individuals with Serious Mental Illness (SMI). Background: In addition to human sufferings, individuals with SMI have physical illness concurrently such as obesity, diabetes, or cardiovascular disease. Their physical conditions are partly related to their diet, sedentary lifestyle in comparison to the general public, and the side effects of their psychotropic medications. These physical health conditions are often left undetected, resulting in morbidity and mortality. Accordingly, healthcare providers should be aware of this dilemma and manage mental illnesses and physical illness concurrently to ensure prevention and reduce disability. Methods: Data was drawn from a study on pedometer-based exercise for adults with a DSM-iv diagnosis of schizophrenia spectrum disorders, bipolar disorders, or major depressive disorders. The original study was a pilot study to test the feasibility of a pedometer-based exercise study for patients with SMI. Data was collected at baseline, after 8 weekly sessions, and after 1 month post-intervention. Data that was used for this study measured 17 subjects at baseline. Physical and mental health was evaluated by the SF-36 Health Survey v2 (SF-36 v2). Brief Comorbidity Questionnaire evaluated general health conditions. Norm-based Scoring (NBS) was used for computing SF-36 v2, and descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. Results: The mean age was 44.35 years old (SD=7.77); 41.2% (n=7) was female; 64.7% (n=11) were African American. The average physical health score for this group was at the norm (50.58) and below the norm for mental health score (45.51). Number of self-reported medical conditions were approximately 6 (Mean=6.24; SD=3.54). Examples included high blood pressure (n=9), headache (n=7), and skin disorders (n=6). Subjects currently experienced around 5 different physical symptoms such as fatigue, weight change, or vision problem (Mean=5.47; SD=4.50), resulting in slightly decreased quality of life (mean=0.92, SD=0.63). The mean score of BMI is 32.97 (SD=7.56). Implications: The results show that patients do suffer from various health problems. They have a decreased quality of life as a result from their major health problems. Health care providers can help to decrease comorbidities experienced by these patients by understanding that the physical conditions are related with the psychiatric illness and can be treated simultaneously. Ways health care providers can help reduce these comorbidities is through routine screenings such as BMI, Waist circumference, blood pressure, lipid panel, blood glucose checks, and encouraging physical activity. Health care providers in psychiatric settings should be educated on the fact that physical conditions need to be treated in congruence with psychiatric treatment. Further research is needed in areas regarding psychosocial interventions that target psychiatric conditions as well as physical health conditions.
Keywords:
Severe Mental Illness; Physical health; Mental health
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5476
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleUNDERGRADUATE NURSING STUDENTen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211559-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this study is to explore physical and mental health in individuals with Serious Mental Illness (SMI). Background: In addition to human sufferings, individuals with SMI have physical illness concurrently such as obesity, diabetes, or cardiovascular disease. Their physical conditions are partly related to their diet, sedentary lifestyle in comparison to the general public, and the side effects of their psychotropic medications. These physical health conditions are often left undetected, resulting in morbidity and mortality. Accordingly, healthcare providers should be aware of this dilemma and manage mental illnesses and physical illness concurrently to ensure prevention and reduce disability. Methods: Data was drawn from a study on pedometer-based exercise for adults with a DSM-iv diagnosis of schizophrenia spectrum disorders, bipolar disorders, or major depressive disorders. The original study was a pilot study to test the feasibility of a pedometer-based exercise study for patients with SMI. Data was collected at baseline, after 8 weekly sessions, and after 1 month post-intervention. Data that was used for this study measured 17 subjects at baseline. Physical and mental health was evaluated by the SF-36 Health Survey v2 (SF-36 v2). Brief Comorbidity Questionnaire evaluated general health conditions. Norm-based Scoring (NBS) was used for computing SF-36 v2, and descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. Results: The mean age was 44.35 years old (SD=7.77); 41.2% (n=7) was female; 64.7% (n=11) were African American. The average physical health score for this group was at the norm (50.58) and below the norm for mental health score (45.51). Number of self-reported medical conditions were approximately 6 (Mean=6.24; SD=3.54). Examples included high blood pressure (n=9), headache (n=7), and skin disorders (n=6). Subjects currently experienced around 5 different physical symptoms such as fatigue, weight change, or vision problem (Mean=5.47; SD=4.50), resulting in slightly decreased quality of life (mean=0.92, SD=0.63). The mean score of BMI is 32.97 (SD=7.56). Implications: The results show that patients do suffer from various health problems. They have a decreased quality of life as a result from their major health problems. Health care providers can help to decrease comorbidities experienced by these patients by understanding that the physical conditions are related with the psychiatric illness and can be treated simultaneously. Ways health care providers can help reduce these comorbidities is through routine screenings such as BMI, Waist circumference, blood pressure, lipid panel, blood glucose checks, and encouraging physical activity. Health care providers in psychiatric settings should be educated on the fact that physical conditions need to be treated in congruence with psychiatric treatment. Further research is needed in areas regarding psychosocial interventions that target psychiatric conditions as well as physical health conditions.en_GB
dc.subjectSevere Mental Illnessen_GB
dc.subjectPhysical healthen_GB
dc.subjectMental healthen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:02:16Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:02:16Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:02:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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