2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211563
Type:
Research Study
Title:
REDUCING THE RISK OF STROKE: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Abstract:
Purpose: The aims of this study were to evaluate the feasibility of the Promoting Older Adult Wellness Intervention (POW) and to explore its effects on increasing physical activity and healthy eating to reduce stroke risk factors. Rationale: Worldwide, stroke is the second leading cause of mortality. Preventing stroke and heart disease are key objectives in the Healthy People 2020 Agenda, which recommends the development of behavioral and social approaches to increase physical activity and healthy eating patterns. Research findings suggest that the level of motivation experienced by older adults impacts physical activity levels and healthy eating behaviors. Wellness Motivation Theory was used to design an intervention aimed at reducing stroke risk by fostering social contextual resources and behavioral change process skills related to physical activity and healthy eating. Method: Sixty-nine multi-ethnic, low to low/moderate income older adults were randomly assigned to the intervention or control groups. Six participants did not complete the posttest measurement. The POW intervention included 8 weekly sessions and the control group received newsletters for 8 weeks. Measurements occurred at baseline and after the 8-week period. Data analyses included descriptive statistics, frequencies, Chi square, and ANCOVA. Significance was set at p < .10 for the preliminary analysis of the POW intervention. Results: The intervention group participants reported high intervention acceptability. Intervention participants scored significantly higher on social support after the intervention, F (1, 59) = 4.48, p = .039. Steps in the intervention group were significantly higher post intervention, F (1, 57) = 3.73, p = .058. Dietary variables and mental and physical health, as reported using the SF-12, were not significantly different between groups at posttest. Theoretically mediating variables, including subscales of the Index of Self-Regulation, were significantly higher at posttest in the intervention group. Implications: This study provides support for the hypothesis that older adults at risk for stroke would find the POW intervention, a theoretically-driven behavioral intervention, acceptable and have improved theoretical and behavioral outcomes following the 8 week motivational intervention. Funding information removed for blinding purposes.
Keywords:
Older Adults; Physical activity; Cardiovascular risk
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
4661
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleREDUCING THE RISK OF STROKE: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIALen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211563-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The aims of this study were to evaluate the feasibility of the Promoting Older Adult Wellness Intervention (POW) and to explore its effects on increasing physical activity and healthy eating to reduce stroke risk factors. Rationale: Worldwide, stroke is the second leading cause of mortality. Preventing stroke and heart disease are key objectives in the Healthy People 2020 Agenda, which recommends the development of behavioral and social approaches to increase physical activity and healthy eating patterns. Research findings suggest that the level of motivation experienced by older adults impacts physical activity levels and healthy eating behaviors. Wellness Motivation Theory was used to design an intervention aimed at reducing stroke risk by fostering social contextual resources and behavioral change process skills related to physical activity and healthy eating. Method: Sixty-nine multi-ethnic, low to low/moderate income older adults were randomly assigned to the intervention or control groups. Six participants did not complete the posttest measurement. The POW intervention included 8 weekly sessions and the control group received newsletters for 8 weeks. Measurements occurred at baseline and after the 8-week period. Data analyses included descriptive statistics, frequencies, Chi square, and ANCOVA. Significance was set at p < .10 for the preliminary analysis of the POW intervention. Results: The intervention group participants reported high intervention acceptability. Intervention participants scored significantly higher on social support after the intervention, F (1, 59) = 4.48, p = .039. Steps in the intervention group were significantly higher post intervention, F (1, 57) = 3.73, p = .058. Dietary variables and mental and physical health, as reported using the SF-12, were not significantly different between groups at posttest. Theoretically mediating variables, including subscales of the Index of Self-Regulation, were significantly higher at posttest in the intervention group. Implications: This study provides support for the hypothesis that older adults at risk for stroke would find the POW intervention, a theoretically-driven behavioral intervention, acceptable and have improved theoretical and behavioral outcomes following the 8 week motivational intervention. Funding information removed for blinding purposes.en_GB
dc.subjectOlder Adultsen_GB
dc.subjectPhysical activityen_GB
dc.subjectCardiovascular risken_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:02:30Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:02:30Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:02:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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