NURSING PERSPECTIVES on CARING FOR OLDER ADULTS WITH DEMENTIA in THE ACUTE CARE SETTING

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211564
Type:
Research Study
Title:
NURSING PERSPECTIVES on CARING FOR OLDER ADULTS WITH DEMENTIA in THE ACUTE CARE SETTING
Abstract:
Background: An estimated 5.1 million older Americans have Alzheimer’s disease or a related dementia (Alzheimer’s Association, 2010).  Many of these older adults will be hospitalized, and receive care in the acute care setting.  Acute care nurses often find caring for these patients difficult because the acute care setting is focused on treating illness and is not set up to meet the needs of patients with dementia.  There is reason to believe that nurses in the acute care setting vary in their level of skill in providing care for these patients (Cowdell, 2010). Purpose: The purpose of our study is to explore nurses’ experience of caring for patients with dementia in the acute hospital setting and to better understand how they gain knowledge and skill in providing care. Methods: We have conducted semi-structured, tape recorded interviews with six staff nurses (with six more interviews planned) who work on the medical surgical units of a mid-sized metropolitan medical center. Nurses were asked to share their experiences in caring for older adults with dementia, to describe barriers to providing care, and strategies they found most effective.  They were also asked about how and where they had learned about caring for older adults with dementia, what additional information they would find helpful in providing this care, and how that information could best be made available to them. Results: Themes identified during preliminary content analysis of the transcribed interviews include: Hospital environment not set up for patients with dementia, Unfamiliar environment and new routines, Patient safety, Working with family to provide care, Modifying nursing interventions, and Learning to care for patients with dementia. Implications: Understanding nurses’ experience of caring for patients with dementia in the acute care setting may increase understanding of the barriers they face in providing care and the strategies that are effective.  In addition, understanding how to make new information most accessible and applicable for nurses will inform future educational programs with the goal of improving care for patients with dementia.
Keywords:
Acute care nurses; Alzheimer's disease
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5487
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleNURSING PERSPECTIVES on CARING FOR OLDER ADULTS WITH DEMENTIA in THE ACUTE CARE SETTINGen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211564-
dc.description.abstractBackground: An estimated 5.1 million older Americans have Alzheimer’s disease or a related dementia (Alzheimer’s Association, 2010).  Many of these older adults will be hospitalized, and receive care in the acute care setting.  Acute care nurses often find caring for these patients difficult because the acute care setting is focused on treating illness and is not set up to meet the needs of patients with dementia.  There is reason to believe that nurses in the acute care setting vary in their level of skill in providing care for these patients (Cowdell, 2010). Purpose: The purpose of our study is to explore nurses’ experience of caring for patients with dementia in the acute hospital setting and to better understand how they gain knowledge and skill in providing care. Methods: We have conducted semi-structured, tape recorded interviews with six staff nurses (with six more interviews planned) who work on the medical surgical units of a mid-sized metropolitan medical center. Nurses were asked to share their experiences in caring for older adults with dementia, to describe barriers to providing care, and strategies they found most effective.  They were also asked about how and where they had learned about caring for older adults with dementia, what additional information they would find helpful in providing this care, and how that information could best be made available to them. Results: Themes identified during preliminary content analysis of the transcribed interviews include: Hospital environment not set up for patients with dementia, Unfamiliar environment and new routines, Patient safety, Working with family to provide care, Modifying nursing interventions, and Learning to care for patients with dementia. Implications: Understanding nurses’ experience of caring for patients with dementia in the acute care setting may increase understanding of the barriers they face in providing care and the strategies that are effective.  In addition, understanding how to make new information most accessible and applicable for nurses will inform future educational programs with the goal of improving care for patients with dementia.en_GB
dc.subjectAcute care nursesen_GB
dc.subjectAlzheimer's diseaseen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:02:33Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:02:33Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:02:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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