2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/211566
Type:
Research Study
Title:
BARRIERS AND FACILITATORS TO HAVING HEALTHY FAMILIES FOR LATINA STUDENTS
Abstract:
Purpose:  The purpose of this study was to explore how Latina undergraduate students define having a healthy family and how they believe their college attendance affects their family’s health. Background: Latinos are currently the largest ethnic minority in the U.S. and by 2050 they are estimated to become one quarter of the population, yet only one in ten has a college degree.  More Latino women (Latinas) are currently attending college than Latino men. To date there has been little research concerning how the health of Latino families is impacted when daughters attend college. The purpose of this study was to learn how attending college affected the health of the families of Latina undergraduate students. Methods:  Using a focused ethnographic design, four focus groups were conducted with 34 Latina undergraduate students at a large university in the northwestern U.S.  Students were asked to define the meaning of family health and how they believed attending college affected their family’s health.  The focus group interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim.  The transcripts were imported into ATLAS-ti6 software for management and analysis. Results:  The Latinas defined family health as having four components: support, being together, communication, and being able to afford healthcare. When asked to describe how their family’s health was affected by attending college they described positive and negative themes related to these components of health. Examples of themes included: very stressful for my mom, proudest parents ever, call me, and having sufficient money. The participants believed attending college both facilitated and provided barriers to their family’s health. Implications: The findings of this study provide unique insights into how Latina undergraduate students define family health and believe their family’s health is impacted when the students attend college. Using this information will enable nursing professionals to better assess the health of Latina college students’ families and to develop and implement culturally sensitive health promoting interventions for them.
Keywords:
Latina undergraduate students; Family health
Repository Posting Date:
20-Feb-2012
Date of Publication:
20-Feb-2012
Other Identifiers:
5493
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleBARRIERS AND FACILITATORS TO HAVING HEALTHY FAMILIES FOR LATINA STUDENTSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/211566-
dc.description.abstractPurpose:  The purpose of this study was to explore how Latina undergraduate students define having a healthy family and how they believe their college attendance affects their family’s health. Background: Latinos are currently the largest ethnic minority in the U.S. and by 2050 they are estimated to become one quarter of the population, yet only one in ten has a college degree.  More Latino women (Latinas) are currently attending college than Latino men. To date there has been little research concerning how the health of Latino families is impacted when daughters attend college. The purpose of this study was to learn how attending college affected the health of the families of Latina undergraduate students. Methods:  Using a focused ethnographic design, four focus groups were conducted with 34 Latina undergraduate students at a large university in the northwestern U.S.  Students were asked to define the meaning of family health and how they believed attending college affected their family’s health.  The focus group interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim.  The transcripts were imported into ATLAS-ti6 software for management and analysis. Results:  The Latinas defined family health as having four components: support, being together, communication, and being able to afford healthcare. When asked to describe how their family’s health was affected by attending college they described positive and negative themes related to these components of health. Examples of themes included: very stressful for my mom, proudest parents ever, call me, and having sufficient money. The participants believed attending college both facilitated and provided barriers to their family’s health. Implications: The findings of this study provide unique insights into how Latina undergraduate students define family health and believe their family’s health is impacted when the students attend college. Using this information will enable nursing professionals to better assess the health of Latina college students’ families and to develop and implement culturally sensitive health promoting interventions for them.en_GB
dc.subjectLatina undergraduate studentsen_GB
dc.subjectFamily healthen_GB
dc.date.available2012-02-20T12:02:40Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-20T12:02:40Z-
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-20T12:02:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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